Not sure if it was a Joke.

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Tim
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Not sure if it was a Joke.

Post by Tim »

I'll sum up an email I received the other day. Basically, asking how long should you dry out an accumulator/drier in a toaster oven! What would be the reasons not to do this? Not sure if someone was messing with me or not.
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JohnHere
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Re: Not sure if it was a Joke.

Post by JohnHere »

I'm not sure, either. Sounds like a joke. But if its not, I wonder where she/he got the idea that it's one of the MVAC Best Practices :lol:
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Re: Not sure if it was a Joke.

Post by Tim »

JohnHere wrote: Wed Aug 18, 2021 9:08 am I'm not sure, either. Sounds like a joke. But if it's not, I wonder where she/he got the idea that it's one of the MVAC Best Practices :lol:
I would not understand that logic. Doing things on the less expensive side is one thing. But that falls into a whole different category of cheap! Things one can find on the internet.
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DetroitAC
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Re: Not sure if it was a Joke.

Post by DetroitAC »

I have a little compressed air dessicant dryer cartridge that is in my air compressor supply line to a machine. It's downstream of a refrigerated drier, and I have it in there because the dessicant changes color from blue to clear when it is full of water, and because I want to be sure the air going to the machine is dry.

When the dessicant is full of water and clear, I regenerate it in the toaster over, takes maybe 6 or 8 hours at 150 F or so and turns back to dark blue. I think it was a serious question, but I have no idea at all if automotive dessicant can be regenerated like that.

Edit: Also, just because I was curious, I put these dessicant beads in a vacuum chamber and left them there for a week, seems like they maybe dried out a little, not sure, nothing like the toaster oven that changed them very quickly.
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Re: Not sure if it was a Joke.

Post by Tim »

I see the reasoning behind you doing it. But a drier is a less than 25 dollar item. I can't see the reasoning to go to those lengths for general repair now if it's some old NLA item. I guess then it would be worth trying.
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Re: Not sure if it was a Joke.

Post by JohnHere »

I, too, have desiccant dryers plumbed into my shop air system, in addition to several other dryers and pre-filters.

When mine become saturated, the beads turn from dark blue to light pink, letting me know that it's time to rejuvenate them, which I do using an ordinary gas grill. I bake them at 200 degrees for as long as it takes (usually about one hour) to recharge them back to the dark-blue, dry state. Doing this is a manufacturer-recommended procedure.

I wondered whether the inquirer intended to cut open the accumulator, remove the desiccant bag, open the bag, bake the beads, and then reassemble everything, including re-sewing the bag and re-welding the outer shell. Or maybe he was asking about baking the entire assembly.

As said, given the low cost of a new accumulator, I question why he would even consider going through all of that work with, at best, a questionable outcome--unless it is an NLA part.

A joke, trolling, or honest question? I'm not sure.
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Re: Not sure if it was a Joke.

Post by Tim »

Thinking of what is on the internet anymore. I'm thinking it may have been an honest question. I'm just amazed at what information and effort people will believe and go through to save .50 cents.
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Re: Not sure if it was a Joke.

Post by JohnHere »

Yes...ain't that the truth? Maybe someone else put that out there as a joke or troll and the inquirer picked up on it as a legitimate, potentially money-saving procedure.
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Re: Not sure if it was a Joke.

Post by Cusser »

JohnHere wrote: Mon Aug 23, 2021 8:17 am I, too, have desiccant dryers plumbed into my shop air system, in addition to several other dryers and pre-filters.

When mine become saturated, the beads turn from dark blue to light pink, letting me know that it's time to rejuvenate them, which I do using an ordinary gas grill. I bake them at 200 degrees for as long as it takes (usually about one hour) to recharge them back to the dark-blue, dry state. Doing this is a manufacturer-recommended procedure.
We used similar desiccant pellets at the analytical chemistry lab, in trays in the cabinets we used to cool samples after they had been oven-dried (to determine "percent solids"). We dried and reused our pellets sometimes, went by the color change. The pellets went by trade name Drierite; there also were molecular sieve pellets.
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