Delenair system on vintage Jaguar

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Smitty
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Re: Delenair system on vintage Jaguar

Post by Smitty »

So, I have a "complete" shop manual for this system, but parts diagrams are a bit limited. It does not show a screen on the expansion valve, but that doesn't mean there isn't one. Can I tell by looking at it whether one is present? I'm assuming the valve has to be disassembled to remove it.

Also, I'm wondering if I should have the compressor rebuilt or try to buy a new one. It's a York 105. Spins freely - clutch is inoperative.
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bohica2xo
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Re: Delenair system on vintage Jaguar

Post by bohica2xo »

Still in production, sixty million units later.

You have choices. Do an oil change & flush, replace the clutch coil & go again if you like. It holds vacuum so the shaft seal is hanging in there.

You could change the shaft seal when you do the clutch.

You could replace the compressor with a rebuilt unit, or even a new one.

Here is the service manual for that compressor:

https://tccimfg.com/wp-content/uploads/ ... 12-16P.pdf
Smitty
Posts: 7
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Re: Delenair system on vintage Jaguar

Post by Smitty »

I'm liking this more and more. I actually did a shaft seal on a York Mini once, and I think it's the same, so I'll do that, flush and put in the right oil, change the clutch coil. This has flange style ports, the suction side with a rotolock, the discharge none. For R-134a, do I replace those? I want a rotolock on the disch side anyway. I don't think there are any other seals to worry about.
Good manual - thanks!
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JohnHere
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Re: Delenair system on vintage Jaguar

Post by JohnHere »

If you decide to invest in a nitrogen setup for the purpose of leak testing, for your safety, be sure to attach a regulator to the cylinder so that you can limit the pressure going into the A/C system to about 100 PSI or less. Bear in mind that a nitrogen cylinder's full pressure is usually more than 2,000 PSI, so regulation is critical. Better yet, just have a pro handle the leak testing, as you alluded to earlier.
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