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86 Ford F150 conversion to r134a

DAVEP on Thu May 29, 2003 3:52 PM User is offline

Year: 1986
Make: Ford Truck
Model: F150
Engine Size: 5.0L
Refrigerant Type: R12

Comment: My system worked fine but stopped working last Sept. after it was used and then sat a few days. Recently checked system and no R12. Put it on a vacuum and It wouldn't hold vacuum but there are is no oil signature at any fittings. Therefore thought it was the evaporator even though a new one had been installed in the last few years. Remove evaporator and leak tested and it was ok. Reassembled and decided I would go to the conversion route to R134a. Have been reading the forum material and especially the "86 Ford F150, May 10,2003" and "84 F150, May 14, 2003. Now I have some doubts about conversion and what should be replaced.

My system is standard with no mods. Horizontal flow condenser, fan is fluid friction controlled, has a fan shroud. I can not find a part number on the compressor / or make as installed. It appears from "FORUM" info that i need: 1.) a HPCO switch, 2.) an orange Ford orfice tube and 3.) a new accumulator drier. I have the freon and oil and the service ports for the change out.

QUESTION: Now!! Is it legal to flush with R134a without taking it apart and at that time pressure check and see where the leak is located. I'm assuming that since it will not hold a vacuum very well that the leak should be findable with out elaborate equipment. Is there any other mandatory changes I need to make to the system before making the conversion. Thanks for any help you can provide.

Charles on Thu May 29, 2003 4:32 PM User is offline

I don't know about "flushing" with R-134a but adding a few oz. for leak checking shouldn't violate any laws. Too bad you didn't try this before pulling your evaporator! Use ester oil, make sure the new drier is 134a compatible, and change all the o-rings while you have it apart. If your old o-tube was dirty, flush the condenser, evap and lines with a flushing solvent and then pull a good vacuum.

I converted my '84 F-150 302, which is basically the same truck, and have had quite satisfactory results. Make sure your fan clutch and shroud are in good shape. Mine has a solid hub and cools almost as well at a standstill as it does on the highway.

DAVEP on Thu May 29, 2003 9:29 PM User is offline

Thanks for the information. When I took the evaporator out all the oil that came out was clear and clean. Not any of the connections had any kind off dirty fluid or metal particles, etc. When I pressure checked the system the first time it had a low positive pressure. I sealed all the parts immediately when I took the evaporator out and then reassembled. So it is hard for me to believe that it ist contaminated with a large amount of moisture. Did you install a hpco valve and a new expansion tube?
Thanks again. DFP

TRB on Thu May 29, 2003 10:02 PM User is offlineView users profile

I would not suggest flushing the system as one. Each component needs to be flushed by itself. Compressor is flushed using some extra oil you plan on using. We use mineral spirits as a flush and blow the rest of components out with nitrogen, do not flush hoses with mufflers or filters they get replaced. I would check that orifice tube for signs of black death and repair any leaks you may have. Also make sure the fan clutch is working correctly as this will cause pressure issues. If it needs to be replaced only use a Motorcraft replacement!

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Charles on Thu May 29, 2003 11:50 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: DAVEP
I sealed all the parts immediately when I took the evaporator out and then reassembled. So it is hard for me to believe that it ist contaminated with a large amount of moisture. Did you install a hpco valve and a new expansion tube?

R-134a and R-12 use a different desiccant material so you have to replace the dryer anyway or the bag will likely break and contaminate all your newly cleaned parts. You don't know a) how much moisture was already in there, b) how good was your "sealing" of the parts, and c) how much more can the dryer tolerate before it is saturated? Just change it

Also if you're retrofitting most people will recommend you use ester oil (HFC-100) and not the PAG oil used with factory R134a systems. Not only is it less moisture sensitive, you can convert back to R-12 if you're so inclined, without another laborious oil change.

Yes, I put in an HPCO valve in series with the compressor clutch, and a new expansion tube. Old one was pretty grimy. I've never hit the cutoff, even at 90+ degrees extended idling in stop-and-go Chesapeake Bay Bridge beach traffic.

DAVEP on Fri May 30, 2003 8:19 AM User is offline

Thanks once again to both of you. That has given me a little more confidence in the conversion and the process. DFP

fordtruckdrivingdude777 on Sun March 04, 2012 12:58 AM User is offlineView users profile

HI IAM NEW TO THIS FORUM. I have a 1984 ford F150 with a 300 series inline six cylinder engine. I am second owner of this truck my started out as a r12 ac system.
But i want to convert it over to r134a ac system. The first owner used as a work truck the mechanic that sold me the truck said the first owner was 70 years old. And getting
to a age where he couldnt drive anymore. I mean the guy musthave been really old fashioned it seems to to me he drove it around a few years with no working ac system
Should i replace everything in the ac system. Because to me driving around with no ac is some thing i just cant put up with no in the middle of summer with sweltering
ninety degree heat outside. Any help you can offer me i would really thankful for the mechanic told me that the ac compressor is frozen so i will have to replace that anyway?


bohica2xo on Sun March 04, 2012 6:20 PM User is offline

Many points on the decision tree you face, but first you need to pin down exactly what you have.

In 1984 a large percentage of Ford pickups had dealer installed A/C, and many had a York style compressor. Which system do you have?

You say the compressor is locked up. You should check that information. On the very front of the compressor clutch is the drive plate. Smaller than the drive pulley by a little bit, and 3/16" thick. Try turning that by hand with the engine off.

Is the drive belt still on the compressor?

Are all of the refrigerant lines still connected in the system?

Post pics here if you are unsure about something.


B.

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"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

chris142 on Sun March 04, 2012 11:18 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: Charles



I converted my '84 F-150 302, which is basically the same truck, and have had quite satisfactory results. Make sure your fan clutch and shroud are in good shape. Mine has a solid hub and cools almost as well at a standstill as it does on the highway.

I agree. Those trucks seem to work well on R134a. As for the leak the first place I would look would be the compressors front seal.

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