Automotive Air Conditioning Information Forum (Archives)

Provided by www.ACkits.com

We've updated our forums!
Click here to visit the new forum

Archive Home

Search Auto AC Forum Archives

Mediocre cooling with Red Tek Pages: 12

RBEmerson on Wed August 19, 2015 7:44 PM User is offline

Year: 1990
Make: Volkswagen
Model: Vanagon
Engine Size: 2.1L
Refrigerant Type: Red Tek
Ambient Temp: 80F
Pressure Low: 32
Pressure High: 125

The OEM a/c in our '90 VW Vanagon camper (Westfalia - AKA westy) is just not getting it done. Long story short, the compressor (new Sanden part), expansion valve, receiver/drier, and one HP hose were replaced two years ago. The system was charged with Red Tek R12A. Things ran well until this past June, when the condenser-end fitting on the replaced hose failed. The o-ring was chewed by debris, the seal failed, and the system vented off. The fitting and seat in the condenser were cleaned up and re-sealed. The shop doing the work returned the vehicle with a vacuum in the lines (they didn't want to work with Red Tek - not a problem for me). I recharged the system with Red Tek R12A and everything worked as expected. The vehicle was out of service for two weeks while we spent time with the in-laws. On returning home, the a/c couldn't do much better than about 60F out of the vents. After lots of adding and venting and then fully recharging into a vacuum, the situation remains the same - mediocre cooling.

On a 10-15 minute drive today (ambient close to 85F), the vent temperature got down to 58F with the inlet (intake to the evaporator) at about 80F. The pressures, at idle, are 32/125 (remember Red Tek runs at lower pressures than R-134A), there's about a 10 PSI drop at 2000 RPM and no further drop at higher speeds. According to tech support for Red Tek, everything is normal except the vent temperature is at least 10F too warm.

The evaporator is in a cabinet (more like a box) hanging over the space behind the back seat. A plenum distributes air into the cabin at ceiling level and air comes in through a grill in the back, which (unfortunately) faces the rear window. Regrettably, dropping the box to check the expansion valve (it hangs off of the evaporator) takes two people to drop it. Replacing the box is, as a friend put it, a good way to "lose my religion" - the condensation drip pan hoses are evil to re-position. BTDT - almost lost religion.

Two questions: 1) why was everything OK when the Westy was parked before the trip and not OK after the trip? The pressures remained unchanged and the system is tight enough to hold a vacuum reliably for a three-day test. 2) how do I begin trying to figure out what's gone sour with the system?

Although I believe Red Tek is a viable refrigerant (worked for two years, until the o-ring failed), at this point I'm willing to shift to 134A if it will help with diagnosing the problem.

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

mk378 on Wed August 19, 2015 8:48 PM User is offline

Is there a heater core in the box? You may have reheating. If the evaporator outlet line isn't getting good and cold, could be undercharged. Or the TXV is faulty and/or doesn't like RedTek.

You should be able to get a major drop in low side by turning off the evaporator fan. Also you could test the compressor by blocking condenser airflow to see if you can get high side to rise. It could be that your compressor isn't pumping very well. What kind of oil is in the system? I think mineral oil is recommended for HC refrigerant. Generally HC is frowned upon here but if you were able to get good performance once, it should do it again.

Edited: Wed August 19, 2015 at 8:50 PM by mk378

RBEmerson on Wed August 19, 2015 9:06 PM User is offline

Nope, no heater core (one under the dash and one under the rear seat - a/c is only over the rear seat).

Turning off the fan drops the low side? OK, I'll give it a try. Trying to keep things under control, I've been spraying (in the misting setting, not direct stream) water on the condenser. Without it, the high side definitely tried to climb way up (170-180).

I'm embarrassed to say that I don't know what oil is in the system. Whatever went in two years ago wasn't noted at the time. I did top off the oil with a Red Tek product ( 2 oz oil, 2 oz R12A), but, again, I haven't a clue as to what they used. FWIW, the compressor doesn't make funny (expensive) noises running or at startup.

The original v-belt for the compressor turned out to be almost too long. I just installed a shorter belt a) to set the tensioner so I have room to tighten the belt over time, and b) as a check against the belt possibly slipping. Aside from having more control over belt tension, nothing changed.

The situation really is frustrating because I've gotten well into the 40's in the past. To be clear about things, there's a lot of glass in a Westy, which means lots of sunlight, which means lots of heating. As long as I can get cold air at the vents, I'm happy, even if the cabin isn't turned into an icebox, as happens with our BMW X3.

One of the attractions of Red Tek is its (claimed) improved cooling relative to 134. In the Vanagon community, it's often recommended because the OEM system is somewhat marginal to begin with. As I said earlier, I'm willing to change to 134A if that will help things. I have a gauge set (of course) and a vacuum pump (Harbor Freight) but no way to reclaim 134 and no reliable way to measure weight.

With Red Tek, there's a 3:1 conversion from R12 to Red Tek R12A. That is, 52 oz of R12 (the VW spec) works out to 17 oz of R12A. Unfortunately, all I have are 6 oz cans, so things are a little hit or miss. The Red Tek guideline, for folks who can't work by weight, is to come up with 32-38 PSI at idle. The present 32 PSI is at the bottom of the range, but still acceptable. Adding more R12A (up to 38-40 PSI) raised the vent temperature into the 60's, ditto when dropping below ~ 32 PSI. 32 PSI is, basically, the apparent sweet spot.

I asked about temperature compensation and was told that the pressures should remain about the same regardless of the ambient temperature. I'm still chewing on that a bit; it doesn't seem intuitively right to me.

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

Edited: Wed August 19, 2015 at 9:23 PM by RBEmerson

RBEmerson on Wed August 19, 2015 9:55 PM User is offline



This is the original compressor, replaced two years ago. What matters here is the plumbing connected to the compressor. At one point, on a VW forum, someone said the pipe (goes to the expansion valve) should be cold enough to sweat on a warm, humid day. I haven't seen the pipe sweat, period. Beyond that, what's a reasonable temperature for this pipe once the compressor has been running for a while?

(And, yes, the dust cover is adapted from a "can o' 134" kit from Pep Boys Advance Auto Zone Car Parts R Us (wherever). I replaced it with a real dust cover.)

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

bohica2xo on Thu August 20, 2015 1:42 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: RBEmerson




Turning off the fan drops the low side? OK, I'll give it a try. Trying to keep things under control, I've been spraying (in the misting setting, not direct stream) water on the condenser. Without it, the high side definitely tried to climb way up (170-180).



Ok, your first post indicates a high side of 125 psi. So the actual high side is 180? Is this at idle @ 80f ambient?


Quote


One of the attractions of Red Tek is its (claimed) improved cooling relative to 134. In the Vanagon community, it's often recommended because the OEM system is somewhat marginal to begin with. As I said earlier, I'm willing to change to 134A if that will help things. I have a gauge set (of course) and a vacuum pump (Harbor Freight) but no way to reclaim 134 and no reliable way to measure weight.

Are you in Canada or some place where you can't buy R12? And which China Freight vacuum pump are you using?


Quote

With Red Tek, there's a 3:1 conversion from R12 to Red Tek R12A. That is, 52 oz of R12 (the VW spec) works out to 17 oz of R12A. Unfortunately, all I have are 6 oz cans, so things are a little hit or miss. The Red Tek guideline, for folks who can't work by weight, is to come up with 32-38 PSI at idle. The present 32 PSI is at the bottom of the range, but still acceptable. Adding more R12A (up to 38-40 PSI) raised the vent temperature into the 60's, ditto when dropping below ~ 32 PSI. 32 PSI is, basically, the apparent sweet spot.

Charging by low side pressure is flawed at best. Idle specs are far different from actual driving, and all pressures vary by heat load.


Quote

I asked about temperature compensation and was told that the pressures should remain about the same regardless of the ambient temperature. I'm still chewing on that a bit; it doesn't seem intuitively right to me.

Yeah, it sounds wrong - because it is.

I have no problem with HC refrigerants. I have used them quite successfully in some situations. The snake oil salesmen that push them however are a problem. Instructions telling people to leave air in the system. Telling you there is no P/T curve for a refrigerant gas. And so on. The snake oil salesmen blend two refrigerant gasses (R290 & R600) to sort of mimic the P/T curve of either R12 or R134a. Your particular snake oil is said to be a replacement for both - which makes it a poor compromise at best.

Since the people selling this stuff will tell you anything, you must be your own chemist. In my experience, the "blend" in the cans you receive is all over the place. You can put a little R290 in a container & fill it up with R600 - and the static pressure will still be high enough to seem ok. R600 has a P/t curve that gives about 8 psi at freezing. R290 is 54 psi at freezing. Obviously any change in blend can give you very different pressures at the same temperature...

But, all refrigerant issues aside - the original failure is troubling:

Quote
condenser-end fitting on the replaced hose failed. The o-ring was chewed by debris, the seal failed, and the system vented off. The fitting and seat in the condenser were cleaned up and re-sealed.

Debris? What debris in an O ring A/C fitting? What were they? Where did they come from?

An O ring fitting is pretty well closed up - that is how it seals. I suppose a loose hose nut would let the fitting rotate and wear the O ring -but the ring should have been lubricated when assembled.

What exactly was "cleaned up"? Has something caused the O rings to deteriorate?

What kind of condenser do you have?

.






-------------------------
"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

RBEmerson on Thu August 20, 2015 2:09 PM User is offline

Um, to be fair, there were no carnival hucksters or snake oil merchants involved. The starting point is past experience from people owning the same or similar vehicles. The support people at Red Tek (Thermofluid Technologies, to be correct) don't push one way or the other. NTL, obviously I do wonder about some comments.

OK, onward.

Everything was fine until it broke. Good cooling, etc. The determiner for what failed was seeing lots of dye at the fitting going into the condenser. It was hard to miss in UV and nothing else in the system showed more than a few drops here and there (notably the high and low port schrader valves - surprise, surprise).

I took the van to a shop known to do good work (including pulling the dash to replace the windshield defroster blower - silly VW for making this necessary!). The tech owns an earlier (air cooled) Westy.

The description of the work was to remove the fitting, clean out the seat, replace the o-ring, re-seat the fitting, and clamp it back down. The seat had enough debris to abrade the o-ring into failure. The old material was taken out with a brush and rags. The opening on the condenser faces straight down, that is, debris shouldn't fall into the condenser.

That this hose failed is not a big surprise. This is the one hose that was rebuilt two years ago (new hose, old plumbing, new crimp fittings) and the condenser end is not even close to fun to work with (little swing room). That crud got into the seat is similarly no surprise. Stuffing the fitting into place was no fun so it's no surprise some crud could have found its way to the seat. (work done by another known shop - unfortunately 50 miles from home - it's a long story)

The condenser is whatever VW put into the vehicle in 1990. Replacing the condenser is... expect to see the winter Olympics in Hades before the condenser is swapped out.

Remember that the system holds a vacuum or pressure reliably. That is, there are presently no known leaks.


-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

RBEmerson on Thu August 20, 2015 4:47 PM User is offline

I just finished a short road trip (~30 min/leg) and found the vent temperature in the 40's. Woohoo!

Uh, and the inlet temperature was ~67, even though ambient (outside of the vehicle) is upper 70's with humidity to match thanks to rain showers and subsequent evaporation. The sky is fully overcast, so there's no significant insolation. The Westy is fairly air tight. With the windows closed, it takes some pushing to close a door thanks to air pressure resisting the door closing. That means there's usually little outside air coming in unless I open a vent.

Bottom line: the temperature differential between inlet and exhaust side of the evaporator remains around 25F. Not so woohoo.

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

RBEmerson on Sat August 29, 2015 9:40 AM User is offline

BUMP - still here with poor a/c

A couple of folks who are involved with this project asked for some readings. All taken with the engine turning at about 2000 RPM for 2 minutes, with a box fan blowing on the condenser:
Ambient temp: 78 Starting Lo/Hi: 28/120
The low pressure drops about 10 PSI when the engine speeds up. After about 2K, there's no further drop.
After running for ~2 minutes, lo/hi 30/140 (typical of inadequate condenser cooling)
Temperature readings at the expansion valve 60/65. This, I think, is Really Bad News.
The readings were taken with two "long spike" thermometers laid on the two fittings going into the expansion valve (which looks like just a metal block). Given where the evaporator is mounted, access to the fittings is minimal and a major PITA. The vent temperature matches the one reading 58-60F.

I assume there should be much bigger temperature differential at the valve. Remember Red Tek is an HC refrigerant that runs at lower pressures than 134A.

If I decide to throw in the towel on Red Tek:
1) What's the weight conversion from R12 (I have that spec in the shop manual) to R134A?
2) Where or how can I get enough R134A without investing in a 10+ lb. tank of 134A? AFAIK, FLAPS have little top-off kits but not "just enough to recharge from a vacuum.
3) Is there any real value in replacing the receiver/drier once I've disposed of the Red Tek charge?
4) What's the best way to add oil to the system, knowing there's oil present from when Red Tek was used? Is there a way to get rid of all the oil in the hoses, at least? DO I need to pull the compressor empty its oil?
5) Should I just say "forget it", pull a vacuum, and take the VW to a shop?

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

RBEmerson on Wed September 02, 2015 8:27 AM User is offline

Bump. Hello? Anybody out there?

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

mk378 on Wed September 02, 2015 9:29 AM User is offline

If the outlet pipe of the evaporator is much warmer than the low side would suggest, usually means it is undercharged. Seeing a drastic pressure drop when you apply additional condenser cooling probably means the fan clutch is shot. This will lead you to undercharge trying to keep the high side down.

If actual CFC R-12 is legal where you live, that would be the gas to use. Nothing works better in an R-12 system than R-12.

Edited: Wed September 02, 2015 at 9:30 AM by mk378

RBEmerson on Wed September 02, 2015 2:40 PM User is offline

Um, I'm happy to say that use of CFC's in general is illegal around here and, AFAIK, throughout the US. On this one, count me as a tree-hugger. [/smile]

I think we're out of sync on the pressures. From the top:
At rest (no engine, no compressor operation) the system is equalized at about 70-80 PSI. It's important to remember we're dealing with an HC refrigerant that runs at lower pressure.
With the engine spinning the compressor, things change to 35-38 PSI and about 140 PSI. This will hold if I mist the condenser from a garden hose. If I do nothing, all pressures rise slowly but significantly over 10-15 minutes (plus/minus). Relying in a box fan, the same thing happens over 20-30 minutes. During all of this the radiator/compressor fan is running.
Push the engine up to about 2000 RPM and the low side drops by about 10 PSI and the high side rises accordingly. Faster engine speeds don't change the drop.

Since Red Tek consistently says these pressures are nominal for Red Tek, I'll leave that part of things alone for the minute.

What I'm seeing at the evaporator is only about a 25F differential relative to the intake side of the evaporator. One very rough attempt to read the temperature on the high and low lines at the expansion valve showed only a 5F difference. I don't have a lot of confidence in the readings (getting to bare metal parts is almost impossible without doing major disassembly). The question raised is: what is a reasonable temperature differential at the expansion valve, on the side away from the evaporator (the expansion valve is effectively clamped to the evaporator)?

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

mk378 on Wed September 02, 2015 3:16 PM User is offline

Like Bohica points out, since they don't publish a P/T curve you can't know where you are at.

It is important (I'm sure you are aware but I'll mention it anyway) to charge HC as liquid because it is a blend. If you use a partial can charged as gas you will change the blend ratio.

I would still try more HC until the high side starts to come up a lot. Does the receiver-drier have a sight glass?

RBEmerson on Wed September 02, 2015 5:12 PM User is offline

I've griped at Red Tek about the lack of a P/T table. No luck on that point. Sigh...

Every time the Red Tek can is opened, it's upside down and I see liquid in the gauge set glass.

The receiver has a sight glass. There are bubbles in the refrigerant. Ordinarily, I'd say this means the system is under-charged. However, earlier I seriously over-loaded the charge (low pressure well into the 40's, which is way above spec) and the bubbles were still there. According to tech support bubbles never go away. In the end, I flushed the system and started all over again.

One point to consider: The present low pressure value is the point which gives the best cooling. A few PSI less or more and cooling drops off appreciably. In short, I think I've got the pressure dialed in about as well as possible.

The mystery is why I can't get a better intake/outlet differential from what seems to be the right pressure. To that end, I'm looking at whether something else is wrong with the system. And that's were the question about the temperature differential across the expansion valve comes from.

If everything seems to check out, but performance is still inadequate, I'll move to 134A.

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

mk378 on Wed September 02, 2015 5:58 PM User is offline

High outlet temperatures with a properly low low side pressure means the evaporator is not full of liquid refrigerant like it should be. Reasons for that would be undercharging or the TXV not operating properly. It will probably eventually come down to replacing TXV but you could try tapping on it to try to get it unstuck.

Edited: Wed September 02, 2015 at 5:58 PM by mk378

RBEmerson on Wed September 02, 2015 8:45 PM User is offline

Ah... Whacking the TXV means dropping the evaporator (which stays in its housing). VW, in their infinite wisdom, didn't leave a way to strip the shrouding to get to the TXV or evaporator and let them operate. And dropping the whole mess takes two guys and the better part of 3+ hours. BTDT, forget the t-shirt.

Sooooo... is there some way to verify what is passing through the evaporator (gas, liquid, both)? And, again, what's a reasonable temperature differential between the line going and coming out of the valve?

The TXV, receiver, and compressor are all two years old and relatively lightly used. The van has been in storage for much of that two years. Obviously, a part could be DOA or a victim of "infant mortality" but I'm somewhat skeptical of that. It may very well be that, for whatever reason, Red Tek and this vehicle just aren't made for each other.

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

mk378 on Wed September 02, 2015 9:34 PM User is offline

The liquid line going from under the hood into the inlet of the valve is whatever comes out of the condenser, it will vary with outside temperature and doesn't mean anything regarding evaporator or TXV performance.

You would have to look at the line out of the valve and into the evaporator, this is refrigerant that has just started to evaporate. It will be on the P/T curve corresponding to the pressure there-- very close to the low side pressure, but the curve you don't have. It sounds like you have no physical access to that point in the system anyway.

Leaving the evaporator the refrigerant is fully converted to gas and will be a few degrees warmer. The TXV regulates this temperature to get full evaporator (as cold as the pressure will allow) but not let liquid leave the evaporator as it could damage the compressor. The number of degrees the evaporator outlet is required to rise above the liquid transition point is called the "superheat" setting of the valve. For known refrigerants the valves are calibrated for a precise superheat that is almost always less than 10 degrees F.

On a block type TXV the suction line goes through the valve body just to sample its temperature and pressure. The valve itself throttles the liquid line.

RBEmerson on Wed September 02, 2015 10:06 PM User is offline

Hmmmm... this reply is good news and bad news.

To clear up a loose end, the TXV is about 1/2-3/4" from the evaporator. VW put fittings on the evaporator plumbing that ties the TXV almost directly to the evaporator. Not the proverbial snowball's chance in Hades of reading anything there short of spending some time with a Sawsall. It's a dumb setup, but it's what I've got. Backing up slightly, there's a big box, hanging from the ceiling, over the rear seat. The TXV/evaporator and two squirrel cage fans are in the box. The only way to drop the box means the evaporator comes with the box, which means the evaporator has to be disconnected. So much for detailed testing.

If I understand your comments correctly, the differential across the TXV isn't very much - say 10F or less. In which case the very questionable reading of the 5F differential I saw isn't hopelessly wrong.

If the pressures are right for the product, which means the right amount of charge is present, the compressor is working, and there are signs the TXV is working, I'm back to doubting the refrigerant. Time for the vacuum pump...

- - -

So I'm sitting in my driveway with a system that has been vacuumed. I know the amount of refrigerant needed when using R-12. I will use R-134A instead. I have a gauge set and a bottle of compressor oil. Now what?

I need 54 oz. of R-12. Where do I get about the same amount of R-134A without buying a 10-20 lb tank? Doing this by weight is going to be iffy (hard to find an accurate scale and don't have a "charge by weight" machine). What pressures should I shoot for?

BTW, I know the answers are in more than one auto a/c FAQ. A link to a good how-to is fine with me.

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

mk378 on Wed September 02, 2015 10:36 PM User is offline

Conversion consists mostly of getting the mineral oil out and replacing it with PAG or POE ("Ester") oil. The amount of effort you expend on getting all the oil varies. At an absolute minimum you should pull the compressor and drain it, and replace the receiver-drier.

Try to use 100% of the R-12 spec in R-134a. Wisconsin and California have restrictions on R-134a sales. In all the other states of the US, anyone can buy it in either 12 oz cans or 30 lb tanks.

HECAT on Wed September 02, 2015 10:41 PM User is offline

If it was original R-12, then 12a; you will want to flush out the mineral oil and use a POE or PAG with 134a.

-------------------------



HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

RBEmerson on Wed September 02, 2015 10:50 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: HECAT
If it was original R-12, then 12a; you will want to flush out the mineral oil and use a POE or PAG with 134a.
Thermofluid Technologies calls their product Red Tek R-12A. IMHO, this is ...um... less than a clever choice for a name. Leading to the confusion cited above. Anyway, the mineral oil is long gone.



-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

RBEmerson on Wed September 02, 2015 10:56 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: mk378
Conversion consists mostly of getting the mineral oil out and replacing it with PAG or POE ("Ester") oil. The amount of effort you expend on getting all the oil varies. At an absolute minimum you should pull the compressor and drain it, and replace the receiver-drier.

Try to use 100% of the R-12 spec in R-134a. Wisconsin and California have restrictions on R-134a sales. In all the other states of the US, anyone can buy it in either 12 oz cans or 30 lb tanks.

OK, that tells me much of what I wanted to know. The remaining wrinkle is nailing down the last 4-6 oz of the needed 52-54 oz. Since doing this by weight will be a problem, what's a reasonable low side pressure at idle? The idea is to get close to the target pressure and check the air temp coming out of the evaporator. When it stops dropping and begins to rise again, I'll vent off enough to reach the pressure when things worked best / coldest.

I'm assuming the 134A should go in as a liquid - yes?



-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

mk378 on Wed September 02, 2015 11:00 PM User is offline

If you have a compatible oil already installed you can just charge with 134a.

Though I go back to the original post and note that you had the parts replaced, charged it with Red Tek, it worked for a short time, and then something failed. That something likely(*) wasn't the refrigerant because you evacuated and put back the same amount of Red Tek and it still didn't work.

* I say that because the new Red Tek you used may not have been the same formula as the old. They don't tell you what it is. In the early days of HC some have reformulated away from an ideal mixture to keep the pressure down within the rating of the can.

Edited: Wed September 02, 2015 at 11:02 PM by mk378

RBEmerson on Wed September 02, 2015 11:41 PM User is offline

The more I fiddle around with this project, the less I trust my recollections. In this case, I'm strongly inclined to think that ambient temperature had a lot to do with my perception of the a/c working or not working.

For example, this morning the a/c darn near froze my neck (I keep one vent aimed at me as a rough way to gauge whether anything good is happening); the ambient temperature was in the 70's. By noon it was into the 80's and my neck was pleasantly cool but in no danger of freezing. It's not so much that something stopped working as it is the relatively small differential allows for really cold air on a cool day. Warm days don't lead to good a/c cooling.

So... maybe the system never worked as it should, it just seemed OK on cooler days.

Again, as best I can tell, everything looks OK, it just doesn't work OK. So if all the pieces are OK, what's left- the refrigerant. Now, if changing to 134A doesn't materially change things, then it's time to panic.

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

TRB on Thu September 03, 2015 1:51 PM User is offlineView users profile

Upgrade the condenser and run R134a. I would flush the system change the Accumulator/Drier and do a proper conversion.

You also have a huge amount of space to cool. Does this system have front and rear units?

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

RBEmerson on Thu September 03, 2015 3:47 PM User is offline

Um, Vanagon condensers are NLA (no longer available). I guess I could find someone who builds radiators, etc. and have one built. But I doubt very much I could do much for increased surface area. I'm stuck with what I've got.

The receiver/drier is on order. I'm going to vacuum out the system and then hand the job over to Motorcar Makeovers in Blue Bell, PA. They've worked on the Westy before, and the tech we work with owns a Westy. The system will arrive with a vacuum and leave, I hope with 134A doing its chilling thing.

Yes, there is a lot of volume and, for that matter, glass in the vehicle.

My criteria for "does it work" is the air temperature out of the vents (mounted over the rear seat). If the temperature differential is around 30-35F, that's OK. If I've got an icy breeze on my neck as I drive, it's working. The cab won't be icy cold, of course, but "cooler than outdoors" works for me. At the moment, that ain't happenin'.

-------------------------
Some days you're dog, some days you're the tree

Back to Automotive Air Conditioning Forum

We've updated our forums!
Click here to visit the new forum

Archive Home

Copyright © 2016 Arizona Mobile Air Inc.