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Braze Perfect

James89dx on Thu December 18, 2014 1:16 PM User is offline

Year: 1989
Make: Honda
Model: Civic
Engine Size: 1.5

I have been curious for a long time about how custom A/C hard lines/fittings are fabricated. I live near Airpro Mobile Air in DFW and have used them a few times over the years for hard line and fitting repairs. I've always noticed the stuff seems to be brazed together somehow and then of course I've always wondered if things like changing hard-line fittings to accommodate different/newer compressors when swapping modern A/C systems into old cars.

I came across this Braze Perfect stuff today which seems to do exactly what I'm interested in. The problem is everything I see about it online seems to be ancient, and I did find a few old threads about the stuff here on this forum. Some were very positive about the product and said it worked very well. One thread here indicated that ackits.com sold Braze Perfect but I can't find it nowadays on ackits.com. I also came across bunches of threads from other automotive forums claiming the product and any other product like it were scams. These threads all claim TIG welding is a must, but none of the stuff I've gotten from Airpro appears welded and I'm assuming those guys know what they're doing.

So just how well does this Braze Perfect type stuff work for say cutting off one hard line fitting and then adding a different style fitting to accommodate a different compressor or layout, or cutting a pipe and rotating it to change the angle of the pipe, etc? Is there a more readily recommended product these days for a DIYer?

TRB on Thu December 18, 2014 1:35 PM User is offlineView users profile

We used this in our shop.

http://www.ackits.com/aluminum-braze-rod


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James89dx on Thu December 18, 2014 1:43 PM User is offline

I saw that on the site but wasn't sure if that's the same type of deal used with Braze Perfect. It looks like Braze Perfect comes with some sort of flux paste in addition to the wire.

How are the rods in your link used? Can it be used to effectively do what I mentioned above (cutting off one fitting and attaching another, for example)?

mk378 on Thu December 18, 2014 6:05 PM User is offline

It is an ancient product. Considerable skill is required in its use because the melting point of the braze alloy is only slightly less than the melting point of aluminum, meaning that it is easy to melt and ruin your workpiece by accident. But it does work.

I wouldn't try to simply butt two tubes together. Find an aluminum sleeve that just fits over the OD of the tube and then braze to it. There are expander tools that can make a bell end on one of the tubes so that the other one fits inside it. Also if there's space you could use a swagelok coupler fitting instead of brazing.

Edited: Thu December 18, 2014 at 6:07 PM by mk378

James89dx on Thu December 18, 2014 6:15 PM User is offline

Yes I was going to ask about the sleeve over the butt joint. I certainly won't try a straight butt joint. Where does one get these sleeves or do people just cut up scrap stuff to use?

Also, I saw another product/brand earlier in the day on my web searching that said its melting point was half the melting point of aluminum which seems like it would be more ideal to work with to not ruin your part. I can't remember what it was called though

TRB on Thu December 18, 2014 8:27 PM User is offlineView users profile

The sticks we sell have a flux within them. They work really well for light aluminum brazing. We always used oxy/acetylene but manufacture states it can be used with a MAP Gas setup also.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

wptski on Fri December 19, 2014 9:45 AM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: mk378
It is an ancient product. Considerable skill is required in its use because the melting point of the braze alloy is only slightly less than the melting point of aluminum, meaning that it is easy to melt and ruin your workpiece by accident. But it does work.

I wouldn't try to simply butt two tubes together. Find an aluminum sleeve that just fits over the OD of the tube and then braze to it. There are expander tools that can make a bell end on one of the tubes so that the other one fits inside it. Also if there's space you could use a swagelok coupler fitting instead of brazing.
Is there ever a time that you'd expect butt joining tubing would work being so thin?

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