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Compressor locking up Pages: 12

masintenn on Mon April 21, 2014 1:42 PM User is offline

Year: 1998
Make: Toyota
Model: Camry
Engine Size: 2.2
Refrigerant Type: 134a

So I recently fixed a leak at the compressor lines, recharged with 28oz and 8oz of PAG46. All was fine, then upon starting the car a couple times, the A/C light flashed and no cold air. Turned it on again after driving for a couple minutes and the A/C ran fine. Same thing happened again today and I could hear the belt slipping and the idle was dragged down.

It seems the compressor has given up, likely due to running low on oil/refrigerant for some time prior to the repair. I've ordered a new Denso compressor, condensor and drier.

Any input? I'm just posting to get some more opinions.

HECAT on Mon April 21, 2014 2:41 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: masintenn
So I recently fixed a leak at the compressor lines, recharged with 28oz and 8oz of PAG46.

It seems the compressor has given up, likely due to running low on oil/refrigerant for some time prior to the repair. I've ordered a new Denso compressor, condensor and drier.

Why did you put 8 oz. of oil in it? Without prior history your guess is good. Could be hurt by oil overcharge also. Make sure you flush everything that you intend to re-use clean and dry, before installing your new parts. Then you can add the full oil charge.

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HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

masintenn on Mon April 21, 2014 2:47 PM User is offline

It calls for 8, but I initially put in 5. After locking up a couple times as described, I evacuated again and recharged with the full 8 oz.

wptski on Mon April 21, 2014 3:47 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: masintenn
It calls for 8, but I initially put in 5. After locking up a couple times as described, I evacuated again and recharged with the full 8 oz.
How do you know if you removed the 5oz of oil that you initially installed? It's a question I think that I posted elsewhere here about recovery machine usage that never got a response.


Edited: Mon April 21, 2014 at 3:47 PM by wptski

masintenn on Mon April 21, 2014 4:20 PM User is offline

I hate to answer this because I'm afraid I'll get hammered if it's my misunderstanding.....but, i thought the PAG oil mixed with the r134a and was circulated through the system. So an evacuated system would be "mostly" empty of both 134 and PAG.

Jag987 on Mon April 21, 2014 4:54 PM User is offline

Carried by or moved with, but typically very little comes out when the refrigerant is recovered with proper equipment. A sudden, large leak like a hose blowing off will cause more oil loss than recovery will. But even then, all will not be lost. I bet you have 20 or more ounces of oil in the system right now. Do as HECAT said, recover, flush what can be flushed, drain the compressor, replace the accumulator and go back to a known amount of oil.

Good luck!

-------------------------
I bought a can of 134a at w**-mart that had a stop leak, oil, and dye in it. It also had a hose and a gauge, so now I'm an AC pro!

Jag987 on Mon April 21, 2014 4:56 PM User is offline

The compressor could be locking up because it is full of oil and oil does not compress.

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I bought a can of 134a at w**-mart that had a stop leak, oil, and dye in it. It also had a hose and a gauge, so now I'm an AC pro!

TRB on Mon April 21, 2014 4:58 PM User is offlineView users profile

Oil is carried by refrigerant not mixed with it. If you placed 8 ounces of oil in a system that was flushed as Hecat states you are fine. If you simply kept adding oil after a compressor failure/issue you have been adding to the original oil amount each time.

A proper reclaimer will only pull a very small amount of oil out of the refrigerant each time the refrigerant is reclaimed.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

mk378 on Mon April 21, 2014 5:35 PM User is offline

Way too much oil. Leaks and recovery machines typically just remove refrigerant, leaving almost all of the oil behind in the car. For a simple leak repair you shouldn't add any oil at all. Even when there's evidence of oil leakage, maybe add an oz-- remember that a little bit of spilled oil makes a big mess.

HECAT on Mon April 21, 2014 5:38 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: masintenn
I hate to answer this because I'm afraid I'll get hammered if it's my misunderstanding.....but, i thought the PAG oil mixed with the r134a and was circulated through the system. So an evacuated system would be "mostly" empty of both 134 and PAG.

It is definitely a misunderstanding, but you are not getting hammered. You came and asked. The oil does migrate thru in the system with the refrigerant, but the refrigerant is recovered mostly as a gas, leaving the oil in the system. 5 and then 8 more; you are definitely overfull of oil. It still could have been a damaged compressor anyway. Make sure you plan out your repair, and ask questions before making any irreversible and costly errors.

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HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

wptski on Mon April 21, 2014 6:44 PM User is offline

Don't want to hijack this thread but since it's been mentioned!! The Mastercool 69100 that I have has a built in oil recovery drain/bottle feature. The first ever use was on a fully charged dehumidifier running R410A, nothing from the drain but a goodly amount pooled in a low spot on the low side hose. This might be a lack of knowledge on my part for sure.

TRB on Mon April 21, 2014 6:58 PM User is offlineView users profile

It's an oil separator, There will always be a very small amount of oil recovered by the machine. The separator simple removes this little amount so you are charging back with fresh clean refrigerant.

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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

wptski on Mon April 21, 2014 7:25 PM User is offline

I left the hoses dangling from the manifold only to find a puddle on the floor. I then drain all hoses into a pan but only the low side hose contained oil. It's only holds 16oz of R410A but much to my dismay, I'm unable to find out what it's supposed to hold. The manufacturer's repair techs had no idea what kind of oil or how much it held. They stated that they've never added oil to one yet they repaired which I find odd.

Edited: Mon April 21, 2014 at 7:26 PM by wptski

TRB on Mon April 21, 2014 7:30 PM User is offlineView users profile

You really should start a new thread on this as someone will think you are using 410a in an auto a/c system!

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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

masintenn on Mon April 21, 2014 8:15 PM User is offline

Thanks for the feedback and info. The parts are ordered so I need to decide whether to install or just recover, flush and start over.

wptski on Mon April 21, 2014 9:40 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: TRB
You really should start a new thread on this as someone will think you are using 410a in an auto a/c system!

As mentioned, I did last year: Here

Dougflas on Mon April 21, 2014 10:22 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: masintenn
Thanks for the feedback and info. The parts are ordered so I need to decide whether to install or just recover, flush and start over.


Why not eliminate a possible problem and recover, flush properly, and start from scratch?

masintenn on Mon April 21, 2014 10:29 PM User is offline

Agreed. The compressor is 16 years old and ran with a leak for at least one summer so it's time to replace it for piece of mind. Ordered a Denso from rock auto for 190. Will post an update this weekend.

TRB on Tue April 22, 2014 12:03 AM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: masintenn
Thanks for the feedback and info. The parts are ordered so I need to decide whether to install or just recover, flush and start over.

DENSO Warranty Information
12 month. IMPORTANT A/C COMPRESSOR WARRANTY NOTE: In order to ensure that proper warranty credit is issued if needed, the compressor installation instructions must be adhered to. All compressors returned for defect must show proof of purchase of an Orifice Tube/Expansion Valve, Drier, and Approved A/C System Flush or a Work Order showing the purchase of these items and that the system was flushed using approved procedures.

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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

masintenn on Tue April 22, 2014 8:42 AM User is offline

I saw that warranty info when I ordered the compressor.

As much as I don't want to pull the dash apart in my Camry, looks like I have to now that I screwed up the first repair by over-oiling. Might as well replace the evaporator if I'm going that far.

mk378 on Tue April 22, 2014 9:29 AM User is offline

Most Japanese cars of those years, the evaporator can be removed after removing the glove compartment door. Disconnect the lines under the hood and pull the entire evaporator box out through the glove compartment hole. Then open the box to R&R the TXV.

If it's not built that way, it will have a block type TXV on the engine side of the firewall. Remove the TXV and flush the evaporator in place.

Edited: Tue April 22, 2014 at 9:32 AM by mk378

masintenn on Tue April 22, 2014 10:40 AM User is offline

Unfortunately, the TXV is mounted to the evaporator in these Gen 4 Camry's and they have to come out together. It's not an impossible job, but a PITA nonetheless.

masintenn on Tue April 22, 2014 10:43 AM User is offline

Quick flushing question.

I've use cans of SuperCool aerosol flush and my air compressor for previous repairs. Is the HECAT sold here that much better that I should switch?

Edited: Tue April 22, 2014 at 11:51 AM by masintenn

HECAT on Tue April 22, 2014 2:01 PM User is offline

Please read the flushing tech paper in my signature. Many of the answers to your thoughts and question about flushing will be found there.

There is no question the HECAT Pulse performance is better than a "poof can". Even without consideration of the kinetic energy of the pulse; measured flow rates (many poof cans) put's us in the range of 10 to 20 times better, and did I mention the pulse energy.

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HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

TRB on Tue April 22, 2014 2:53 PM User is offlineView users profile

There is no comparison to what Hecat offers in the Pulsator compared to what others offer in the same class of equipment. You need volume, power and a pulsating action to remove the debris and oil. As Karl mentions, the answers are in the tech sheet he has written and provided to the members of this site.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

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