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2000 Saturn L series compressor coil inop

GM Tech on Thu June 27, 2013 10:37 PM User is offline

Year: 2000
Make: Saturn
Model: LS
Engine Size: 2.2L

So my VOM says coil is wide open- I remove compressor and dissassemble front end- see coil has a plastic encapsulated thermal fuse- with my VOM attached to coil terminals - I jumper blown fuse-and the resistance is on the money at 3.45 Ohm....so I solder in a nice piece of copper wire (from ground ogf #14 house wire)- and then a dab of JB weld to close the deal and seal it nicely- reassemble and it works great- go on the internet to find new pumps are $600+ remans are $400+ salvage yards are few and far between of even having them- many Saturn forum speak of inop clutch coils-- wonder how many others have figured out that the fuse is blown on the coil.

The thermal fuse is designed into the coil to prevent "walk-homes" where if the compressor seizes- the pulley and clutch slips and generates massive heat- this in turn blows the thermal fuse so the pulley bearing can still be used to drive to the nearest a/c shop and not walk home....but that thermal fuse can blow too early (or at too low a temp) in the underhood temperature environment- seen it wherever thermal fuses in coils are used- what is designed toi be a benefit to owners is actually a detriment! such is life - all I want to know is how and why it happens- I can usually fix the designed in problem....there are actually coils out there with NO thermal fuses- so I meerly make this coil look like the "no fuse" coil...

Easiest $100 bill I ever made....

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

wptski on Fri June 28, 2013 8:56 AM User is offline

If a compressor seized, your AC would stop if ON, lots of noise, maybe smoke from a slipping belt so enough warnings to just flip the switch to off. Since there is a gap between the coil and the pulley's friction surface and surrounding area it would take a bit of time for heat to transfer to the coil.

What does a good thermal fuse normally look like?

A frozen clutch pulley is another story.

GM Tech on Fri June 28, 2013 10:18 PM User is offline

90% of folks would not understand the a/c was at fault- to shut it off themselves...thus the design to blow the fuse at about 375F more or less

A good thermal fuse has continuity- does not matter what it looks like- it is buried under a plastic cover- you must chip plastic away to see it- it looks no different- the fuseable part is inside the fuse housing- coils that fail wide open have a pretty good chance the theraml fuse is blown..

A red hot pulley or clutch driver will generate 500+ degrees in under a minute-

The belt never slips in most cases-always the clutch driver. Belt slips were in the days of vee-belts...

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

Cussboy on Fri June 28, 2013 10:36 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: GM Tech
Belt slips were in the days of vee-belts...

Hey - I've AC with V-belts in my 3 trucks: 1988 Mazda B2200, 1998 Frontier, 2004 Frontier !!!

minnzona on Mon June 02, 2014 9:51 PM User is offline

minnzona on Mon June 02, 2014 10:03 PM User is offline

Good day GM Tech,
My daughter has a 2000 Saturn LS1 2.2 that I am 99.9% sure the A/C Clutch Coil High Temp Fuse is Blown. I have the tools and capability of performing the procedure that you have described. I would like to know if this can be accomplished with the compressor in place. If so, please provide a brief description of how. Thank you very much.
minnzona

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