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134a best price

Turbo on Sun June 16, 2013 9:18 AM User is offline

Does anyone know of a good supplier for 134a. Need a case or two, maybe a 30 lbs cylinder if the price is good.
Thank you

Edited: Sun June 16, 2013 at 9:31 AM by Turbo

94RX-7 on Sun June 16, 2013 11:01 AM User is offline

This probably isn't the answer you're looking for, but I found better prices on R-134a cans at Target than I did at my local auto parts stores.

mk378 on Sun June 16, 2013 11:21 AM User is offline

It's much cheaper in a cylinder, if you're looking at using case quantities (30 lb = 40 x 12 oz can). It's a commodity so you have to shop for it every time. Some of the chain parts stores keep them behind the counter. Also ask car dealers, not a place you'd usually go looking for bargains-- but they go through a lot of it and sometimes have a good deal from their supply chain.

wptski on Sun June 16, 2013 12:49 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: 94RX-7
This probably isn't the answer you're looking for, but I found better prices on R-134a cans at Target than I did at my local auto parts stores.
About a buck cheaper at Wal-Mart.

TheApocalyptican on Sun June 16, 2013 4:23 PM User is offline

Best price I could ever find locally was at Sam's Club. Had to buy a case of 12 cans though.

wptski on Sun June 16, 2013 5:41 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: TheApocalyptican
Best price I could ever find locally was at Sam's Club. Had to buy a case of 12 cans though.
What's that work out to per can?

iceman2555 on Mon June 17, 2013 11:55 AM User is offlineView users profile

Why the heck would one wish to charge a car with small cans of refrigerant. This is a major cause of compressor failures due to lack of sufficient recharge and the effect upon lubricant migration. OH YES...it is cheaper.....well when your replacement compressor locks up...clutch burns up....or the compressor is noisy.....remember...this are all oil related failures....and could be the directly related to the recharge method.
There is almost no proper method to recharge a vehicle correctly with cans....large (30 lb ) or small. Shops lacking the proper recharge equipment are the major cause of compressor warranty issues. For a DIY'er the percentages are astronomical. Save your time and labor....money...have the system serviced properly and use the correct equipment. Pressures are not an indication of a properly recharged system.
Also keep in mind there is contaminated refrigerant in the market.....typically 30 lb cans......major contaminate is R30 or R40. Google these contaminants....be surprised what you read.

-------------------------
The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.
Thomas Jefferson

wptski on Mon June 17, 2013 1:53 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: iceman2555
Why the heck would one wish to charge a car with small cans of refrigerant. This is a major cause of compressor failures due to lack of sufficient recharge and the effect upon lubricant migration. OH YES...it is cheaper.....well when your replacement compressor locks up...clutch burns up....or the compressor is noisy.....remember...this are all oil related failures....and could be the directly related to the recharge method.

There is almost no proper method to recharge a vehicle correctly with cans....large (30 lb ) or small. Shops lacking the proper recharge equipment are the major cause of compressor warranty issues. For a DIY'er the percentages are astronomical. Save your time and labor....money...have the system serviced properly and use the correct equipment. Pressures are not an indication of a properly recharged system.

Also keep in mind there is contaminated refrigerant in the market.....typically 30 lb cans......major contaminate is R30 or R40. Google these contaminants....be surprised what you read.
You might as well close this forum to DIY'rs! Does a DIY'r need 30 lb of R134A? Worse yet, what if I'm using R12? What's a DIY'r going to pay for that? AC Kits, whom I think supports this forum, will they sell a DIY'r a compressor? Who does this forum cater to? Having to pay to have the system properly serviced by a shop with. as you state with the proper equipment might cost more than the car is worth.

mk378 on Mon June 17, 2013 7:31 PM User is offline

My experience as a DIY is that this site and AMA certainly endorses DIY repairs, as long as you attempt to know what you are doing. Anyone can buy a 30 lb of R-134a, there are no legal restrictions on it. Using a cylinder with a scale leads to a cleaner and more accurate charge than using cans. Anyone can buy the same tools that a shop uses, and acquire the knowledge to use them. It is somewhat expensive, but considering what shops charge, pays for itself in only a few uses.

Shortcut methods are definitely a false economy in A/C repair, as there is the almost certain probability of further damage and even more costly repeat work. This holds true whether the work is "professional" or DIY.

wptski on Mon June 17, 2013 7:40 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: mk378
My experience as a DIY is that this site and AMA certainly endorses DIY repairs, as long as you attempt to know what you are doing. Anyone can buy a 30 lb of R-134a, there are no legal restrictions on it. Using a cylinder with a scale leads to a cleaner and more accurate charge than using cans. Anyone can buy the same tools that a shop uses, and acquire the knowledge to use them. It is somewhat expensive, but considering what shops charge, pays for itself in only a few uses.



Shortcut methods are definitely a false economy in A/C repair, as there is the almost certain probability of further damage and even more costly repeat work. This holds true whether the work is "professional" or DIY.
Does one job warrant a 30 lb purchase of R134A?



Edited: Mon June 17, 2013 at 7:41 PM by wptski

iceman2555 on Mon June 17, 2013 10:34 PM User is offlineView users profile

This was to imply that the DIY'er market is dead...but a major contributor to compressor failures (warranty) is the lack of sufficient lubricant migration. Lubricant migration is controlled by the volume of refrigerant (recharge) and velocity (any restrictions). A reduction of recharge will reduce the amount of lubricant within the system. This is a fact...no BS....no I did not mean to hurt your feelings....just a fact.
Make your repairs and then have the system charged by someone who has the proper equipment. This will save money and time in the long run.
As far as the DIY'er market....it is slowly dying, without proper service equipment most repairs/diagnosis is beyond the reach of the average DIY'er. The introduction of HFO 1234yf and the lack of supply for small cans will drive AC repairs, as far as recharge, to an certified technician. The refrigerant will not be available in small cans. Well, it is available in small containers....10 lbs at a cost in excess of $650.00.
The introduction of clutchless/constant operation compressors have made diagnosis more difficult if not impossible for the DIY'er. Heck it is past the scope of many techs, but that is another issue altogether. Even licensed shops that do not operate with the proper equipment contribute the most to compressor warranty issues.
It is almost impossible to recharge later model systems (small charge amounts) with cans and pressures. The use of pressures is not an indication of a fully charged system. Pressures are a diagnostic tool for a fully charged system.
If my post hit a nerve....so be it....it is the change of systems that contributes to the issues the DIY'er encounters. This site (personally felt to be the best) and others are here to offer assistance. Like all, one would like to facilitate repairs only once.....and the introduction of short cuts reduces the percentages of a successful repair. This stands true thru out the entire repair spectrum. We are here to help....often our advice is followed....perhaps often not.....we are not paid for your time or efforts...it is totally a volunteer operation. The average DIY'er posting here is exposed to and benefits from 100's of years of experience and experience is a very expensive learning process.
Good luck with your repairs....keep in mind...a improperly repaired system will produce improper service. Do the darn job one time.....but do it correctly.

-------------------------
The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.
Thomas Jefferson

wptski on Mon June 17, 2013 11:28 PM User is offline

I'm bullet proof, your comments don't hurt. As far as the HFO1234yf, look into Daimler in Germany where by law anything sold this year is supposed to have that new stuff but instead they've been using R134A because they think HFO1234yf is unsafe. What vehicle sold in the US uses that stuff right now? I was thinking that R134A might be phased out soon but after reading about Daimler, I'm not so sure.

Yeah, low charge means low lubrication and I've read where they tell you to jumper a switch to force the compressor to run. That's one thing I thought was wrong and didn't do.

I was a machine repairman at Ford Motor for >35 years, can't get repair work out of my blood.

I was referring to this article: HFO12334yf and that may been Mercedes-Benz not Daimler.

Edited: Tue June 18, 2013 at 8:49 AM by wptski

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