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Sealers...what to do?

Metal Man on Mon March 26, 2012 9:05 PM User is offline

Hello guys. I'm new to AC service. I'm currently in Automotive Technical College. Once I'm done with school i plan to buy my own Recovery/Recycle machine,identifier and sealer detector.

My question is what to do if/when i do encounter a vehicle with some type of sealer in the system. I don't want to use my new machine to recover the refrigerant/sealer mix do I?

What do you guys do?

How do you service the vehicle?

Use a vacuum pump?

mk378 on Mon March 26, 2012 9:59 PM User is offline

There is a test kit to determine if sealer is present. If it is, you close the hood and tell the guy the truth, the only cure is a total system replacement. Considering the types of cars and people who use sealer, that's likely to be prohibitively expensive. He's welcome to try somewhere else.

Edited: Mon March 26, 2012 at 10:01 PM by mk378

TRB on Mon March 26, 2012 10:46 PM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: mk378
There is a test kit to determine if sealer is present. If it is, you close the hood and tell the guy the truth, the only cure is a total system replacement. Considering the types of cars and people who use sealer, that's likely to be prohibitively expensive. He's welcome to try somewhere else.

Pretty much sums it up for many or us.

Neutronics AC System Sealer Identifier

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HECAT on Wed March 28, 2012 7:15 AM User is offline

There are two types of sealers; one that swells seals and one that hardens (crystallizes). The "sealant detector" only identifies the presence of the hardening type, so there is no method to determine if the sweller type is present in the system. To best protect your recovery equipment from such unknowns, it is recommended to use a filter product called the "Recycle Guard". This device will separate the oils before they enter the machine; thus protecting it from ingesting the sweller or hardening type of sealer.

It is always your prerogative to close the hood and refuse to service the vehicle. But in many cases it may be your vehicle, or someone elses that you wish to assist with a resolution. The sweller type is usually and fairly easily removed with a effective flushing method used to remove the oils and other contamination from the system. The hardening type may also be removed but this must be done with an immediate plan to flush when the system is opened, as you may only have minutes available before it begins to harden. Once this material has hardened inside the system; the only type of chemical (acid) capable of dissolving it, will also dissolve many of the common materials used in the construction of the system. This where total system replacement becomes the only option.

You cannot recover with a vacuum pump.

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FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

Metal Man on Wed March 28, 2012 8:53 AM User is offline

A neutronics identifier and sealer detector are for sure on my "to buy list". I also been looking at the Robinair 34788

Hecat, this is the first I've heard of the "Recycle Guard". I'll be looking into that as well.


Thanks guys. Any and all advise is welcome.

Metal Man on Wed March 28, 2012 9:05 AM User is offline

Ok HECAT after a quick search i found this Recycle Guard

Is this the same thing? If so i looks pretty interesting.

HECAT on Thu March 29, 2012 6:55 AM User is offline

Yes, that is the recycle guard. It is available from many distribution sources.

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HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

NickD on Thu March 29, 2012 10:43 AM User is offline

Still never was proven that CFC's cause ozone depletion, even NASA backed away from that. When the EPA got involved with all this, first certification, then approving refrigerants strictly on the basis of supposed ozone depletion with many rats climbing out of the woodwork trying to sell EPA approved substitutes.

Created a hell of mess, not only sealers, but refrigerant mixes as well. So you need an identifier for other reasons as well.

Another thing that grips me is the EPA isn't doing a thing against the OE's, Ford comes out with springloks, GM with leaky compressor seals, Chrysler with poor evaporators, Honda with poor expansion valves, etc., not a word is said about this. But you as a tech and be fined $25,000 if you release an ounce of remaining refrigerant. If there is even an ounce to recover.

Also not easy to do a conscientious job, like already mentioned, guy down the street will do it cheaper, not the right way, but cheaper.

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