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MHardee on Sun August 07, 2011 4:27 PM User is offline

Year: 1998
Make: Chevrolet
Model: Monte Carlo Z34
Engine Size: 3.8
Refrigerant Type: R134A
Ambient Temp: 105
Pressure Low: 110
Pressure High: 180
Country of Origin: United States

Bought from ACKits about a year ago.. after a not so great experience with the rebuilder dude in Florida shipping the wrong one first, a leaking one second and finally after three weeks of him getting me the right one has worked GREAT until two days ago...

Compressor (V5?) started making a not-so-loud rumbling the other day that,, from what I've been reading on this forum, seems to be associated with high pressures.. Went to put guages on this morning and when I removed the high side cap I noticed schraeder valve leaking.. Hot damn, this is going to be an easy fix... not so much... I am going to look at the ACKIts store to see if they offer a replacement schraeder...

Placed guages on car, static is 110.. OK, a little light - I AM leaking after all...

Started and - Uh Oh.... Low side is 125 and high side is 195... On first WAG (Wild Ass Guess) would one suspect the Control Valve in compressor has taken a dive? If so, is it replaceable?

Thanks for any hints or help...

Mark

-------------------------
True Shade Tree

mk378 on Sun August 07, 2011 6:16 PM User is offline

Noisy compressor, does not pump; I'd say there's a good chance it's come apart inside.

bohica2xo on Sun August 07, 2011 6:18 PM User is offline

With a V5 pressures can be odd without a full charge. Evacuate & recharge by weight to evaluate the system.

The rumble could be an idler, the bearing behind the clutch, the alternator, a belt tensioner ... Pull the belt off and start turning things by hand. Many times the added torque on the belt from running the A/C will make a noise start & stop with the compressor.

B.

-------------------------
"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

MHardee on Sun August 07, 2011 9:26 PM User is offline

Sooooo.... broke down system, found a bit of shavings in the OT... It seems the rebuilder dude has struck again... I haven't looked yet but I am guessing warranty is one year and this is one year and 1 month old... I am sure Adam remembers all the calls we had on this deal... we had a heck of a time (three weeks!) getting the correct compressor and he had mentioned they had some failures on his parts and were looking to change suppliers...

Is ackits still using the same rebuilder?

-------------------------
True Shade Tree

GM Tech on Sun August 07, 2011 9:55 PM User is offline

This scenario is exactly why I re-seal OEM pumps when they leak and NOT replace them.....I'd rather fix a leak on a functioning compressor than take a chance on a rebuilt unit...

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

bohica2xo on Sun August 07, 2011 10:02 PM User is offline

Was the condensor replaced with the last compressor?

B.

-------------------------
"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

TRB on Sun August 07, 2011 10:12 PM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: GM Tech
This scenario is exactly why I re-seal OEM pumps when they leak and NOT replace them.....I'd rather fix a leak on a functioning compressor than take a chance on a rebuilt unit...

Re-manufactured compressors are OEM pumps. These days I would replace with a new import.

Depending on how much debris is present. Might just be a control valve the has gone south. Might take a chance and get one out of a wrecking yard compressor.

-------------------------
When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

MHardee on Mon August 08, 2011 1:04 AM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: GM Tech
This scenario is exactly why I re-seal OEM pumps when they leak and NOT replace them.....I'd rather fix a leak on a functioning compressor than take a chance on a rebuilt unit...

GM tech:
I am beginning to believe this myself. WARNING: Gonna be a long post!
History:
Daughter's 98 Monte Carlo 3.8... Original sytem had a leak. Knowing that seals are an issue on these I figure heck, I will order a new compressor, orifice and accumulator and be done with it. OT was clean as a whistle.. Order from AMA, (and BTW, during all of this that follows, AMA did everything they could to get this mess correct) wrong compressor sent, stuff happens. They send another one along with free bottle of oil. Drain oil, install 2nd compressor another $40 R134 and go on. Remember this is a 3.8L V6.. 2 days later the upper intake plenum disaster takes place (leaking antifreeze into intake) and motor spins bearings. Pull motor to rebuild leaving AC system intact. While car is sitting, I notice pool of refrigerant oil (w/dye) below compressor.. front seal is leaking on rebuilt unit.

I call AMA and tell them what's happening and they tell me "they've had some problems with their rebuilder"... he'll send another. It comes about three days later and it's the wrong compressor again. Call back and they say they'll get it handled.. A week goes by.. nothing... Call back and they say they'll check... Another week.. nothing... To make a long story short, the rebuilder was not as forthcoming with the truth as we'd like... He was evidently out of cores to rebuild and just told everyone he was sending it to end the phone call... Anyway, a few days later the correct compressor arrives..

I get the motor done, install it and get everything back together.. Put new compressor on, vacuum and recharge and my life is good.. Oh contraire! 2 days later it is not cooling. Take the UV light and glasses and find evap leaking (most probably the original problem)... Replace evap, measure oil contained in it, add oil, vacuum and recharge life is good...

Fast forward to today, one year later.. System has been cooling great until now. Pressures and such listed in original post, but, last compressor has taken a dive.. Staring at original compressor that I still had and wonder.. hell, evap was the original leak! Yea, you know... I put in it, vacuum and recharge oil and gas and it's cooling like a murph... Wait a minute... what's this oil spot? I will be damned... seal is leaking on this one! Sitting in a box for a year, guess so...

SO.... do I purchase all the tools to do a seal install and fix this one... Do I purchase another rebuilt compressor and hope.... Do I purchase a new compressor... Would I get another one from AMA if they are using this same rebuilder (some dude in Florida)? Probably not... This has not been a pleasant experience.. Will I buy from AMA? DEFINITLY! They have been nothing but help in the past and have always managed to do what THEY said they would do..

Now, am I an A/C tech? Nope.. I am what is probably 75% of the people here are.. We do this because we do work on our own stuff, we are mechanics with some tools and some knowledge. I've built motors, raced cars, boats and motorcycles. I don't have (but would love to have) a $350 Hecat Pulsator to flush everytime... The system ran great for a year... IMHO, it seems to me that if I had too much oil, trash in system or not enough gas that the system would not have functioned perfectly for a year, would it?

Anyway, thanks for reaffirming what I had been pondering before I came back here and read your reply... I am seriously considering buying the tools and seals and putting this original compressor back together. I am still studying and trying to decipher what exactly fails on these compressors. especially after viewing the thread on this forum where the guy documented changing his seals..

WWGMTD? (What Would GM Tech Do)?

Mark



-------------------------
True Shade Tree

iceman2555 on Mon August 08, 2011 10:48 AM User is offlineView users profile

Goodness...it is always the compressor.....if the repair job goes great...it is a good technician....if the jobe goes badly....it is always the compressor. Go figure !!! Last year we tested many of the FS10 and 'V's' returned for shaft seal leaks. Some had them and some did not....seems it is a good ploy for a tech to simply state the 'shaft seal was leaking'. However, of those that did exhibit shaft seal leaks....some of them we simply did a 'compotopsy'.....we discovered that the shaft seal area was completely dry...not one drop of lube in that area ! Others we added the correct amount of lube into the compressor.....stood the compressor on its drive plate for a few moments....rotated by hand...ran the compressor on the 'pump test stand' and then retested for shaft seal leaks......oppsss...what the heck....where did it go.....ooooohhhhhhhhhhhmmmmmmmmmmmmmmgosh......magic.....
But that being said...the 'V' is one of the most misunderstood compressors on the market....other than the scroll.....and requires dedicated service procedures. It is essential that the system be throught clean....notice it was stated that the orifice 'had shavings'......to me this means the condenser is history.....needs to be replaced.....but...but...but...did not have a high side pressure problem....nope....the measurement of the high side was on the down stream side of the restriction....hence a trememdous pressure drop in the condenser.....discharge pressures will be high...but on this vehicle...one is testing the liquid side of the condenser. Several factors come into play....one the possible restriction in the condenser results in a decrease of refrigerant flow....thus also a decrease of lube flow.....ahhhh...less lube in the compressor.....the shaft seal is in the suction sice of the compressor....less refrigerant flow...less lube....dry shaft seal....equals leaks. Also keep in mind that the pressure valve of this compressor senses low pressures in the rear head of the compressor....less refrigerant flow at this area results in a decrease of pressure....the compressor senses that this lower pressure is the evaporator beginning to freeze.....at this point the compressor begins to 'destroke' itself. The compressor does this by allowing discharge pressures to enter into the cavity of the comrpessor thru the control valve. During this 'destroke' mode...the flow of lubricant is greatly reduced...in some cases it may actually stop. Once more less lube in the compressor....and less lube around the shaft seal = shaft seal leaks. If this 'pressure ' at the sensor does not modulate with the down stroke and up stoke of the compressor...the compresso can remain in a 'de stroked' mode.....at this point the compressor is going to fail. This compressor is very sensitive to either and undercharged condition or a restriction in the system. Both of these conditions will greatly reduce the longevity of the "V".
Another issue with this compressor is the placement of lubricant in the compressor....the lube should be introduced into the compressor at the 'plug' on the side of the compressor. Failure to add lube at this point results in a 'dry' start up and can result in irrepairable damage to the unit.
bohica2xo is entirely correct...this system must be charged correctly....an attempt to charge without a weighted metering system will result in a decrease of compressor longevity.
Gotta go...jury duty...will come back later...

-------------------------
The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.
Thomas Jefferson

MHardee on Mon August 08, 2011 11:45 AM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: iceman2555
Goodness...it is always the compressor.....
......to me this means the condenser is history.....needs to be replaced.....

Another issue with this compressor is the placement of lubricant in the compressor....the lube should be introduced into the compressor at the 'plug' on the side of the compressor. Failure to add lube at this point results in a 'dry' start up and can result in irrepairable damage to the unit.

bohica2xo is entirely correct...this system must be charged correctly....an attempt to charge without a weighted metering system will result in a decrease of compressor longevity.

Or was it a bad unit? Really not trying to argue here, but... let me try to explain the reality of "our" world.. I REALLY appreciate the time and effort everyone here takes to TRY and educate and help us...

"The condensor needs to be replaced..." why does Hecat sell flush units? I don't have the car here right now but I thinks it's a tube and fin.. Flushing *should* clean it right? And then there's the evap.. replace it or clean it? Some of out here are true shade tree mechanics with a good understanding of metal in lube causes problems. Can we afford to have every problem repaired by a tech? Nope, and probably if most are like me, we have an inherant "distrust" of repair shops - let's face it there are some very poor folks out there... Believe me, if I could afford to send this deal to a shop that could fix it for a reasonable price and I would not have to worry about it, I would! I don't enjoy laying on my back removing compressors... I have witnessed what I thought to be reputable repair shops doing a helluva lot worse job replacing a compressor than I would! No scales, no evacuation...

I do add the oil in the sump and the suction port and rotate pump... I build motors and am painfully aware of the pre lubing of mechanical components...

My current unknown is oil content and cleanliness.. So, should I invest $350 in a flush unit or pay someone around the same to do it for me? I haven't had much luck finding someone that has the equipment that is willing to JUST flush my system and then hand it back over to me to do the labor...

Then, new compressor, rebuilt, or replace the seal on current one.. many decisions..... I can tell you I definitly do not have a scale.. but 12 oz x 2 does equal 24 ounces, right?

Regarding the seal leak issue... I can tell you for sure that the oil streaks on my garage floor are pretty damn good evidence that it is leaking! Green everywhere! :-)

There is also the feeling I do have that the rebuilder sent me a unit that was maybe not one he would have put on his daughter's car!

Going back to pondering my options! Hope your Jury duty goes: Well, short and maybe you take a scumbag off of the streets!

Mark




-------------------------
True Shade Tree

Edited: Mon August 08, 2011 at 11:53 AM by MHardee

bohica2xo on Mon August 08, 2011 12:31 PM User is offline

Ok, let me post a quick outline, I get confused easily:

1) OEM compressor was replaced to fix a leak that eventually turns out to be in the evaporator

2) Reman compressor leaks oil at shaft seal, evaporator still leaking.

3) Second reman compressor replaces leaking reman. Evaporator still leaking

4) Evaporator leak is located & repaired. System runs for a year without issue.

5) A new leak occurs, reducing the system below critical charge & it stops cooling. Appears to be the service port leaking.


At this point the compressor is immediately condemned. Any engine or accessory drive noise is now the fault of the compressor. The 13 year old condensor has never been flushed or replaced. an unknown quantity of oil exists in the system.

As I said earlier, a V5 can do some odd things when nearly empty. Rather than tearing the system open you should have evacuated & recharged the full charge for evaluation. It may have been as simple as a bad service port. The metal you found on the OT could have come from any of the compressors, including the OEM unit. Crud can hang out in a condensor like that for a long time before it migrates to the OT.

B.

-------------------------
"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

TRB on Mon August 08, 2011 1:55 PM User is offlineView users profile

MHardee

I'm here to help where I can. The idea that every compressor can be fixed with a shaft seal and gasket kit has lead to a ton of complaints the past few years. Sure if you have some skills and the proper tools along with a good compressor. A seal repair can repair a leak. Seals will do little when the compressor is bad, has a bearing going out among other things. There is a trend in the industry these days to bypass the procedures which attain the best over all results. Companies like compressor works will then have to eat the cost of these missed procedures. I have had this discussion over and over with vendors and Hecat. Do you want debris or burnt oil in your system? It's the cheap route for the repair but is it the best way for a repair? I truly believe there will come a point that vendors will offer a 30 day warranty on compressors. Not because of poor products. But of the added claims from poor procedures.

Now I'm not saying the people trying to save a dollar are the problem and can't do a repair. I honestly don't know how to supply every item dirt cheap, honor a 12 month warranty for anyone that follows whatever procedure they or their buddy think is good enough.

If I can help you with some parts let me. Again I'm glad to help where I can.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

MHardee on Mon August 08, 2011 2:32 PM User is offline

Tim:

I just sent an email to [email protected] asking about some parts. If you wish, either call me at 978-886-9905 or give email me a contact number and I'll call you ([email protected]) .. I do need to get this done and no, I do not want to cheap out here.. it's my daughter's car and I do NOT want to worry...

Thanks!
Mark

-------------------------
True Shade Tree

MHardee on Mon August 08, 2011 2:42 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: bohica2xo
Ok, let me post a quick outline, I get confused easily:

1) OEM compressor was replaced to fix a leak that eventually turns out to be in the evaporator
2) Reman compressor leaks oil at shaft seal, evaporator still leaking.
3) Second reman compressor replaces leaking reman. Evaporator still leaking
4) Evaporator leak is located & repaired. System runs for a year without issue.
5) A new leak occurs, reducing the system below critical charge & it stops cooling. Appears to be the service port leaking.

At this point the compressor is immediately condemned. Any engine or accessory drive noise is now the fault of the compressor. The 13 year old condensor has never been flushed or replaced. an unknown quantity of oil exists in the system.


Wow! I think you are clairvoiant! You have nailed it perfectly.. At this point, I plan on ordering a new compressor, condensor, mainfold hose (it has a muffler), accumulator and OT.. I will flush the remaining lines and evap.. and hopefully live better..

One of your statements made me go hmmmmmm... You mentioned evacuating and recharging to known quantities.. I agree.. but, where I am very foggy is without flushing everything out of lines, condensor and evap as well as draining compressor, how do you know how much oil is left hanging around unless you flush it all out? If there is some magical machine and tech that can pull ALL of the gas and ALL of the oil out of compressor, coils and lines.. how would I KNOW for sure? It also amazes me that I can look three places and get three different answers on oil capacity.. (There is nothing noted as far as oil goes on the sticker on car - says 1.88 lbs of R134A but nothing about oil capacity...)

Then you will see "if changing accululator - add 1 oz.... if changing condensor add an ounce"... it is my understanding that (if it was on the label) if the quantity listed shows 9 ounces, that would be 9 ounces with a totally dry system.. Would I be correct in that assumption?

Yea, I know what "they" say about assumptions! :-)

Mark


-------------------------
True Shade Tree

TRB on Mon August 08, 2011 4:13 PM User is offlineView users profile

Thanks for the support Mark.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

GM Tech on Mon August 08, 2011 7:11 PM User is offline

Actually the shaft seal on a V-5 compressor is in the crankcase where there is always a good supply of crankcase oil- hence the drain bolt in the crankcase....There are three pressure zones in a v-5, discharge, suction , and crankcase-- suction can be much higher than crankcase- therefore the pistons stroke, then when suction is lower than crankcase, the pistons destroke...simple balance of pressure across the pistons themselves- front of piston is suction pressure, rear is crankcase pressure- the control valve determines when to release crankcase pressure or increase it-- stroking or destroking the compressor.. not really that hard to understand....

Of the hundred or so V-5s I see a year, I'd say I get a failed unit maybe once in three hundred compressors-- 99.6 percent are loss of refrigerant due to a shaft seal leak and the infamous belly o-ring leaks. That is why I re-seal them. I always check for function before a re-seal just to be sure... V-5s trashing themselves are very rare in my neck of the woods...I can save nearly all of them.

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

bohica2xo on Mon August 08, 2011 7:51 PM User is offline

Mark:

Sometimes the "shotgun approach" is what is needed. Since you took the time to build a new engine, and it is your daughter's car you will know it is as good as new.

Just like building a quality engine, there is no magic. To do a quality engine you would remove all of the galley plugs and clean every passageway. Same goes for an A/C system each component should be disconnected and flushed individually. Do all shops do this? probably not.

When we tell someone to flush back "to bare metal", this is to get all of the oil out . Machines like the HECAT will do this. Metal parts like the evaporator will tolerate some strong solvents. People have cleaned evaporators with solvents like laquer thinner sucessfully, but there is a risk of fire and or paint damage if you are not careful. My personal flushing equipment runs on R600, but that is not exactly shadetree friendly.

Since you will have esentially all new parts foreward of the firewall, you have only metal parts to clean. Get them as clean as you can. The most important thing about flushing is to get all of the solvent back out. Any remaining solvent can ruin things quickly. it takes a large volume of clean, dry compressed air to clear an evaporator well. Obviously the solvents hat evaporate fully at room temperature are easiest to get rid of - and usually the most dangerous.

The oil capacities listed for individual components are at best an educated guess. They were written for a flat rate mechanic replacing a part. This is another reason we tell people to flush systems. Start from square one. For family vehicles that will be under my care for a long time I like the Mitchell subscription. it will list the total oil charge for the vehicle, along with every thing else usually found in the FSM. If an underhood label says "9 ounces of oil" that would indeed be the total system capacity.


B.

-------------------------
"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

MHardee on Mon August 08, 2011 8:53 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: bohica2xo
Mark:



Sometimes the "shotgun approach" is what is needed. Since you took the time to build a new engine, and it is your daughter's car you will know it is as good as new.

Just like building a quality engine, there is no magic. To do a quality engine you would remove all of the galley plugs and clean every passageway. Same goes for an A/C system each component should be disconnected and flushed individually. Do all shops do this? probably not.

When we tell someone to flush back "to bare metal", this is to get all of the oil out . Machines like the HECAT will do this. Metal parts like the evaporator will tolerate some strong solvents. People have cleaned evaporators with solvents like laquer thinner sucessfully, but there is a risk of fire and or paint damage if you are not careful. My personal flushing equipment runs on R600, but that is not exactly shadetree friendly.

Since you will have esentially all new parts foreward of the firewall, you have only metal parts to clean. Get them as clean as you can. The most important thing about flushing is to get all of the solvent back out. Any remaining solvent can ruin things quickly. it takes a large volume of clean, dry compressed air to clear an evaporator well. Obviously the solvents hat evaporate fully at room temperature are easiest to get rid of - and usually the most dangerous.

The oil capacities listed for individual components are at best an educated guess. They were written for a flat rate mechanic replacing a part. This is another reason we tell people to flush systems. Start from square one. For family vehicles that will be under my care for a long time I like the Mitchell subscription. it will list the total oil charge for the vehicle, along with every thing else usually found in the FSM. If an underhood label says "9 ounces of oil" that would indeed be the total system capacity.

B.

Thanks for the details... Understand building a motor and trying to use the old bearings... 'ya just don't do it... Anaolgy is the same... everything was progressing along until AMA (or anyone else I can check as well) has the manifold hose in stock. AC Delco has discontinued it.. So, I guess when I disassemble everything I will have to blow it out with air and see if anything comes out (other than oil) and hope their is no surprises in muffler.. I will continue to lool for one while parts are entroute..

Thanks a ton to everyone that has helped.. I'll let you know how it goes...



-------------------------
True Shade Tree

TRB on Mon August 08, 2011 9:16 PM User is offlineView users profile

GMTech. I'm talking in general with my comments. People read a post that it's easy to reseal a compressor and think every compressor and can be resealed. We will ask if they have the tools to replace a seal. We get sure I have a box full of tools. I'm not trying to be disrespectful to anyone trying to fix their a/c. But if one thinks a hammer and screwdriver is what's needed. They might not be up on what it takes to reseal a compressor. Also, when the seal fails, it's not a junk seal 99.9 percent of the time.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

TRB on Mon August 08, 2011 9:18 PM User is offlineView users profile

Mark, you can always rebuild that hose minus the muffler.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

GM Tech on Mon August 08, 2011 9:42 PM User is offline

Mufflers are only there for noise abatement when the car is under warranty no one wants a new car with an a/c humm or buzz noise---but an older car can humm or buzz all day long and no one cares...as long as it is cooling...

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

MHardee on Sat August 13, 2011 9:34 PM User is offline

Update on progress.....

Received all parts from AMA Friday afternoon. Starting tearing down to install:

New condensor
New Compressor
New Accumulator
New OT
Flush evap and lines from Evap to Accumulator and where it goes into condensor...
Blow air for 1 hour
Vacuumed for 2 hours

6 oz oil in compressor
3 os oil in accuumulator
2.2 lbs R134a

Ambient temp 94 degrees
Low side 54 - High side 210
Vent temp 64 degrees at 2000 rpm...

I was disappointed that vent temps were higher than expected and thought low side looked higher than expected and high side lower than expected... This is a new set of guages I bought from AMA (Mastercool 6673) and maybe I am just seeing correct pressures for a change? I left thermometer in vent for daughter to watch and let me know how it does..

Also to note, I had approximately 75% of the charge in before compressor would engage?

Do these numbers appear odd?


-------------------------
True Shade Tree

TRB on Sat August 13, 2011 9:55 PM User is offlineView users profile

Did the info I sent call for 9 ounces of oil?

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

JJM on Sat August 13, 2011 10:45 PM User is offline

Did you lube the OT rings with oil before inserting? Did it click into place?

Not sure if the condenser lines are the same size on this vehicle, but if they are, is the condenser plumbed properly?

Joe

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: www.ACKits.com


MHardee on Sun August 14, 2011 8:47 AM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: TRB
Did the info I sent call for 9 ounces of oil?

Yes - 9oz of oil and 2.2 lbs refrigerant


-------------------------
True Shade Tree

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