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Remanufactured Compressor - Poor Performance Pages: 12

nkmhockey on Sun July 11, 2010 10:30 AM User is offline

Year: 1997
Make: Buick
Model: LeSabre
Engine Size: 3.8L V6
Refrigerant Type: R134A
Ambient Temp: 90F
Pressure Low: 33PSI
Pressure High: 195PSI
Country of Origin: United States

My problems originated with the classic V5 compressor clutch drag. There was a loud scraping noise intermittently when the clutch was not engaged. The metal shavings were pretty bad; it looked like the clutch had already been permanently damaged.

I proceeded to purchase a remanufactured compressor, new accumulator, and new orifice tub. I installed it with my Father a few weeks ago. It took a few tries to get the fitting on the back of the compressor to seal properly, but we eventually got it on successfully. The specifications for my car called for 8 Oz. of PAG-150 oil – so we dumped 5 Oz. directly into the compressor and poured the last 3 Oz. directly into the new accumulator. When we changed the orifice tube, we noticed that the old orifice tube had clearly been contaminated with “black death” – there were metal shavings and other debris all over.

We pulled a vacuum on both the high side and the low side for twenty minutes. We disconnected the pump and monitored the pressures – the vacuum held fully for over twenty minutes. We charged the system with R134A by weight (the system calls for 32 Oz.). Using a leak detector, we were able to verify that there were absolutely no leaks in the system.

The temperature at the vents during the conditions listed above was 75F (relative humidity was around 80%) – putting the system on recirculation with the windows up resulted in a small temperature drop at the vents, maybe around 72-70F.

On another day (without the gauges attached):
Ambient: 80F
Relative humidity: 40%
Temperature at vents: 70F

According to the ‘System Performance Chart’ from AllData, the system is definitely not performing within specification. I have already verified that the air actuator on the blend door is functioning correctly. I also want to note that we changed the blower motor and wheel (due to a squeal on loud speeds). Is my system performing as expected? If not, what could possibly be causing the pressures to read within spec, but the performance to be so poor?

I greatly appreciate any help in this matter. Thanks in advance and I will be happy to post any other information that is needed.

TRB on Sun July 11, 2010 12:53 PM User is offlineView users profile

2 areas of concern to me. You mention debris in the system and nothing was done about it. You added oil to a compressor, was shipping oil removed. Good chance your replacement compressor has sucked in all that debris which is not a good thing and will void most manufactures warranties. Which I don't blame them. Can't expect them to honor a warranty when the repair was not performed correctly. Not good news but it is the true from what I read in this post. My suggestion is to read Hecat's tech paper on flushing and try and save the compressor before it locks up again. New accumulator and fresh oil will be needed. I would also replace the condenser if you can't get all the debris out of it which for that type of condenser requires a flush machine like the Hecat H1000.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

nkmhockey on Sun July 11, 2010 11:41 PM User is offline

Sorry – I failed to mention that the remanufactured compressor was shipped with no oil. There were bright red stickers all of the outside of the box stating that no oil was present in the compressor – I was able to verify that with the company I purchased it from. The compressor came with a 12 month warranty, but it is only valid with receipts confirming that a certified A/C technician did the installation. My Father had certification in the past, but it is expired, so the warranty is not valid.

The system was not flushed because before the compressor was replaced, there were no leaks. My understanding is that a flush is only necessary when the system is contaminated by outside air/debris. Is that correct? The black shavings on the old orifice tube were from internal damage to the old compressor. When we had the lines off to replace the orifice tube, we flushed them out with compressed air, but did not use a flush solvent or do anything else to the other lines.

Is there a way to tell for sure that changing the condenser will fix the problem I am experiencing? If I am going to take the condenser out to clean it, I might as well replace it. Also, is it possible to flush the system without any special equipment? I am open to all ideas, but sadly I do not have access to all of the amenities of a professional garage.

Thanks for the suggestions so far – I am still open to any ideas.

TRB on Sun July 11, 2010 11:53 PM User is offlineView users profile

That was some poor information you got that only outside debris should be a concern. System needs to be flushed and new accumulator, compressor, condenser and OT will also be needed. If that is not done you will continue to have poor cooling and compressor failures over and over again until the job is finally done correctly.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

CCWKen on Mon July 12, 2010 12:05 AM User is offlineView users profile

609 certifications don't expire, only the expertise. Your "helper" should have known the system needed to be flushed and not just blown out. I agree with the others that you will continue to have problems until the system is repaired correctly. There's no way around it. They don't call it Black Death for nothing.

-------------------------
Ken Kopsky

Custom Car Works
"Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the obedience of fools."

nkmhockey on Mon July 12, 2010 8:33 AM User is offline

If it is a 13 year old vehicle with the original, obviously failing compressor, and the system still cooled – I am sure that the new compressor was not “ruined” after only a few months of use. My Father did A/C work earlier in his career before 609 Certification was required by law (1993).

If I were to replace the accumulator, condenser, orifice tube, and the line including the mufflers at the rear of the compressor, would a local shop flush and fill the system? Or do you have a recommendation for an affordable flushing system?

You are clearly over-exaggerating the severity of the situation – recommending nearly $1,000 in parts and equipment alone to a car hobbyist is not helpful information. Either recommend a local Pittsburgh, PA shop that is capable of doing the work, or give me some information that is actually helpful – talking down to me isn’t going to fix anything.


Edited: Mon July 12, 2010 at 8:33 AM by nkmhockey

iceman2555 on Mon July 12, 2010 10:23 AM User is offlineView users profile

Unfortunately the AC service is moving into the realm of professional service only. The statement of cost of parts and correct equipment becomes a more common issue with each passing year. The move to single service port locations negates the ability of charging with a 'can and hose'. The charge rate of late model vehicles is so specific that an attempt to charge with a 'can and hose' is a proven highway to compressor failure.
nkmkockey, first and foremost, this vehicle has not 'suffered' the dreaded 'black death'. The debris that was indicated within your system is a normal occurrence for vehicles that have been operated with an insufficient amount of refrigerant to properly migrate lubricant thru the system.
The system does indeed need to be flushed and prepared for properly compressor installation. The work that was accomplished was done in a straight forward manner...up to the point of not cleaning the system.
Acquire a good cleaner, there are multiple sources. Stay away from the aerosol type flushes. They simply lack the amount of chemical to properly clean a system. Also stay away from mineral spirits flushed, they are impossible to remove from the system. What ever flush chemical you decide to use, be sure to air purge the system to aid in removal of residual chemicals. The system should be flushed until it is clean....this may take several qts of flush chemical. Capture the material and screen it for indications of debris removed.
It is possible that the installed compressor is still functioning, the replacement of the compressor would be a decision on your part. A suggestion would be to replace the unit, operation for a period of time without sufficient lubricant flow will damage the unit internally. Be a shame to complete all the work and then discover that the re installed compressor had failed and had decontaminated the system. But, what the heck...its just labor and its free.
Evacuation of the system should have been for more time, 20 minutes is not sufficient time to adequately remove moisture. Many feel that the longer the better, however, there is a point of diminishing returns. 45 minutes is acceptable. Should have an ambient temp of 75-80 degrees. If cooler than this, operate the engine during the evacuation to increase component temps. Of course, the compressor should be dis engaged during this process.
Adding lubricant to the system is easy...prefer to have a bit more in the accumulator and less in the compressor. 2-3 oz is sufficient for the compressor...the remainder in the suction side of the accumulator.
Insure that the system is completely recharged....weight is important....know the margin of error for your scales. Also allow for or totally precharge all hoses and manifolds and then '0" the scales. An undercharge of 3-4 oz can be a serious amount for this vehicle.
A good method to test for proper charge...after the vehicle AC has been operational for 5-10 minutes, simply test the inlet and outlet temps of the evap. They should be the same temp. Do this with the system in max heat load....MAX AIR, HIGH BLOWER, DOORS OPEN, ENGINE @ IDLE. A slight variation of 3-5 degrees is acceptable.
Do not rely on pressures alone to determine charge rate.....know how much refrigerant is in the system.
Personally, considering the OE failure and possible debris within the system, the new compressor installation and possible debris, the condenser should be replaced. Just my $.02 worth.
Also, if the vehicle is equipped with mufflers on the AC lines, insure that these units are totally clean...remove and flush...flush...flush. Would be better to consider replacement of these units also. One never knows if the components are totally clean.
It is understood that these parts are quite expensive.....however, there are few if any shortcuts to a successful AC repair. DO IT ALL....DO IT RIGHT...DO IT ONCE !!!!!!!!!
Good luck with the repair.

-------------------------
The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.
Thomas Jefferson

nkmhockey on Mon July 12, 2010 11:15 AM User is offline

Finally – thank you, Iceaman, for some truly sensible information! It is a sad state of affairs – I have noticed that all aspects of cars are moving towards professional service only. Even basic work on my parents’ cars (2001 Aurora and 2002 Regal) is extremely difficult compared to work on my 1997 LeSabre and my brother’s 1996 Lumina.

The vehicle was purchased used at around 100,000 miles – I have no information on how the original owner treated the A/C system, but he did have regular maintenance records for all other areas of the car.

Does this look like a good flush solution?
Advance Auto Flush Solution

How does one go about flushing the system - is it simply a matter of dumping the solvent through the refrigerant lines several times and then blowing dry with compressed air, or is there more to it?

What lines should I focus on? The lines around the condenser, accumulator, and compressor can be easily removed for flushing, but the lines at the evaporator would be extremely difficult to remove. There are mufflers on both sides of the compressor, but for $90 plus shipping to replace the lines, I am not that worried about any debris.

I am not concerned with replacing the compressor – it has shown no signs of wear. As you said, labor is free, I might only get 3 months out of it, but I might get 3 years, who knows. I would rather wait for it to fail and get as much for my money as possible.

After the flush, if I were to leave the same compressor and accumulator, will it be necessary to re-add any oil?

Later today, I plan on spraying water over the condenser to see if it has any affect on the vent temperatures. If it does – I will replace the condenser and orifice tube, flush the lines I can get access to, evacuate for 45 minutes, and re-charge the system by weight. If not, I will try cleaning the condenser/radiator of debris and straightening the fins on the front of the car to improve airflow.

Thanks again, Iceman, your insight has proven most valuable so far and I appreciate your straightforward, useful advice.

TRB on Mon July 12, 2010 11:57 AM User is offlineView users profile

All I did was point out the failure in your original repair procedure, like it or not! If you think that is over-exaggerating so be it. Ice and everyone else in this thread have told you. The debris you have in the system is bad for compressor life & a/c performance! Now what you do with that information is up to you!

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

nkmhockey on Mon July 12, 2010 12:22 PM User is offline

Your posts were both abrasive and not informative. Ice did not agree with you, quite the contrary, he clearly stated that it is not a case of ‘black death’ and that the contamination I saw was from the original compressor failure, exactly as I stated in my original post.

You question my knowledge and experience, meanwhile, you recommend replacing components that are not damaged and a flushing procedure that is overkill for the situation. I am not arguing that there is no contamination, simply that my original statement that major contamination, requiring a professional flush, is only caused by air/water/debris somehow getting into the A/C system via an external leak. That is not the situation I am in.

My Father and I did the work ourselves thus far – barring one simple mistake (failure to flush with solvent) – we will continue to do it ourselves until the job is finished properly. Recommending expensive equipment and procedures that are not needed is of no help. I will do with this information what is most economical and logical – isolating a bad component (condenser) and taking the necessary steps to correct the problem (replace, flush, and re-charge).

bohica2xo on Mon July 12, 2010 12:26 PM User is offline

A flush is necessary when you do major system work, simply because you have no idea how much oil is in the system. As Iceman stated, newer systems require precise quantities of oil & refrigerant. Simply having too much oil in degrades system performance

The condition of that V5 you have now depends on WHERE you put the oil in it. Where did you "dump" this 5 ounces of oil?

Forget flushing that condensor. It is a 6mm piccolo - personal experience tell me that TRB is right - to flush that thing takes expensive tools. Buy a NEW condensor. I believe that is the point he was trying to make.

The line set with mufflers? I would replace it. If the debris made it all the way to the orifice tube, the lines are contaminated as well.

Flush the evaporator to bare metal. This means no oil remaining, no solvent remaining. Lots of air is required for this. After flushing the evaporator, blow some air into one line, and sniff the air coming out of the other. If you smell solvent, it is still in there. You need to keep blowing.

Replace the accumulator. You have no way to quantify the oil remaining in it.

B.

-------------------------
"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

Edited: Mon July 12, 2010 at 12:26 PM by bohica2xo

TRB on Mon July 12, 2010 12:31 PM User is offlineView users profile

Sounds more like one is a little sensitive! You failed to do the job correctly. You listened to someone that said not to worry about metal shavings inside your system. If that is abrasive so be it! That fact remains you have 6mm T&F condenser with a multi pass design. Debris such as you state can block those passages and a bottle of flush is not going to clean it out.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

TRB on Mon July 12, 2010 12:35 PM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: iceman2555
The system does indeed need to be flushed and prepared for properly compressor installation. The work that was accomplished was done in a straight forward manner...up to the point of not cleaning the system.

Quote
Originally posted by: iceman2555
It is possible that the installed compressor is still functioning, the replacement of the compressor would be a decision on your part. A suggestion would be to replace the unit, operation for a period of time without sufficient lubricant flow will damage the unit internally. Be a shame to complete all the work and then discover that the re installed compressor had failed and had decontaminated the system. But, what the heck...its just labor and its free.

-------------------------
When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

mk378 on Mon July 12, 2010 1:04 PM User is offline

The V5 is an oil sump design. To charge with oil, unscrew the oil plug from the side (refrigerant pressure must be zero first) and pour oil directly into the center part of the compressor. Put most or all of the specified system oil amount in there. If you didn't do that, your compressor has basically been running dry and absolutely should be replaced.

nkmhockey on Mon July 12, 2010 1:18 PM User is offline

The 5 Oz. of oil was poured directly into the oil plug – exactly per the instructions of the company I purchased the compressor from. We sealed the oil inside using the screw that came pre-installed on the compressor itself.

Most documentation I have read, including the ‘black death’ article on ACkits.com have said that contamination in the evaporator core is unlikely. Due to the location of the core and the steps necessary to remove it – I likely will not be flushing it. I have already cleaned the outside of the evaporator and the air chamber with cleaner and water.

The refrigerant hoses with the mufflers – will flushing them get the majority of the debris out? I would really like to avoid replacing them, if possible ($81.99 with free shipping from Advance Auto Parts online - RockAuto is actually more expensive - around $105 + shipping). I am moot on replacing the accumulator – it is cheap enough that I would be willing to replace it, but at the same time it is difficult to replace a part that is less than a few months old.

TRB – I did not contend anything Ice said about flushing, so your quotes are in vein. I can read – I am merely disagreeing that any professional equipment is needed to do the flush. I can’t imagine why you, a person associated with the store that sells said equipment, would push me towards purchasing it so readily – conflict of interest?

MK378 – That was the procedure that was followed before the compressor was even mounted on the car. On the bench, we added 5 Oz. of liquid PAG-150 oil directly into the oil plug. If we evacuate the system to change the condenser, will that 5 Oz. of oil still remain in the compressor?


Edited: Mon July 12, 2010 at 1:27 PM by nkmhockey

TRB on Mon July 12, 2010 1:30 PM User is offlineView users profile

I've never once suggested you buy a flush product or anything else from us! An assumption on your part! Matter of fact I prefer you don't as I don't want to deal with your warranty claims! Knowing the job is not being done correctly in the first place. Flush the mufflers that will be a wise move.. By chance would you think the flushing agent left behind in the baffles will destroy the compressor oil? After all it is designed to break down these oils and there is no way you can flush through mufflers. But you already know that and are willing to do it anyway!

Have fun with your repair. I truly hope it works out for you. But you need to know the difference between doing something cheap and doing it improperly.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

nkmhockey on Mon July 12, 2010 1:48 PM User is offline

Your signature says it all. Warranty claims? Since I would contact you for a warranty claim regarding components I never purchased from your site? Since purchasing flush product from your site would hold you responsible for anything I use the flush product in?

Stop insulting me. Believe me, I understand that you probably get hundreds of posts a week from clueless individuals who do home-brew compressor installations, fail to add oil, and come asking why it has failed within the week. These individuals are likely barely fit to change their spark plugs, let alone deal with a something as complex as an air-conditioning system. But – don’t lump me into the same oblivious group as them.

I have spent hundreds of dollars over the years fixing this car up with my Father – we have done countless jobs from changing the intake manifold gaskets to replacing the fuel pump and sending unit – our experience is not to be doubted.

You need to learn about something called cost/benefit – I am not going to spend $100 to replace a refrigerant line that has a minute amount of contamination, if any. As I have said before, the system worked for 13 years with metal shavings, I am sure I can squeeze more than a few months out of the components I have already purchased. Besides, you are the one that said I should, “try and save the compressor before it locks up again,” when the original compressor never even failed. It cooled the day I took it off my car – but you already knew that since you are such an observant reader. Thanks for the sentiments, but do us all a favor, keep your comments to yourself from now on.

bohica2xo on Mon July 12, 2010 2:05 PM User is offline

Insulting you?

I have not yet begun.

You are a whiney little twit. You roar in here with part of the information in your first post, then start the whining. I can sure tell high school is out for the summer.

You know little or nothing about MVAC systems, and plan to disregard anything that does not fit your ideas. If your daddy is so sharp, why are you here with a question? Your experience is "not to be doubted" HAHAHAHA Comedy gold. You changed a fuel pump once, you is now MVAC expert.

That 1997 GM junker is probably just a year or two from the crusher anyway, so why not just sweat out the summer? Hang out at mickey dees with the other 16 year olds and forget about the a/c.

Go outside & play kid. We don't need your crap here.

B.

-------------------------
"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

TRB on Mon July 12, 2010 2:20 PM User is offlineView users profile

I've never insulted you! I said you are failing to do the job correctly and will continue to have issues until you accept that fact. You are correct, I answer these same posts over and over again and have been doing this for many years. So if my responses are short and to the point so be it. There is a search feature on this site that would have answered every question you had! If you cared to use it! It is simple, debris is bad. burnt oil is bad. Flushing agent left in system is bad, certain condensers can't be flushed w/o proper equipment. These are the facts what you do with them is for you to decide.

I've seen some pretty dirty evap cores. So to think debris will not get past an OT or exp valve is not the case for every vehicle.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com


Edited: Mon July 12, 2010 at 4:32 PM by TRB

iceman2555 on Mon July 12, 2010 4:38 PM User is offlineView users profile

Damn, for once, I have presented a good normal answer to a question....far from being my normal abrasive response.....oh well....as my 'boss' says 'he's just old and cranky' !!!! Been doing massive amounts of PROZAC to maintain my 'good nature' during all this hot damn weather and all the stupid ass questions that come thru my phone......opps...I am regressing once more......today....one call....4 new A6 compressors...same vehicle....four....as in 1----2----3----4...one less than 5.....all have had clutch failures after a few days operation.
First question....what happened to the OE (first) compressor to require replacement....answer....the clutch failed.....damn...how stupid can one get.....never think of performing a diagnosis of the possible cause of the clutch failure...lets simply install another compressor and see what happens.......bet my boss gets a call on that response.....

The insanity of it all.....Einstein said it best: "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results."
Albert Einstein

Any way....far be it for me to but in again...think enough has been said already....BUT STAY AWAY FROM THAT FLUSH!!!!!.

Check with, opps forget that one.......darn does one smell old oak burning.....those darn old bridges.....!!!

Just do a bit more research on chemicals and one will surely present itself.....something that is easily removed from the system...air purge....and maintains a good liquid flow thru out the process (does not evaporate to easily). Stay away from 'oil' (actually a POE) based flushes.

The best idea is to replace the condenser....those lines with mufflers and flush the evap....over and over till it is clean. The evaporator maintains the largest amount of lubricant when a system is operated with an insufficient amount of refrigerant to migrate lube...so it is first on the flush program.

Cost factors are important to any repair...but having to do the darn thing over and over is....well.....see above once more.

DO IT ALL !!!!!!!!! DO IT RIGHT !!!!!!!!! AND THUSLY....DO IT ONCE !!!!!!!!!!!!!


-------------------------
The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.
Thomas Jefferson

TRB on Mon July 12, 2010 4:46 PM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: iceman2555
Damn, for once, I have presented a good normal answer to a question....far from being my normal abrasive response.....oh well....as my 'boss' says 'he's just old and cranky' !!!!

Good thing some of us now how much of a sweetheat you really are!

-------------------------
When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

HECAT on Mon July 12, 2010 5:35 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: nkmhockey
Since purchasing flush product from your site would hold you responsible for anything I use the flush product in?  Stop insulting me.  Believe me, I understand that you probably get hundreds of posts a week from clueless individuals who do home-brew compressor installations, fail to add oil, and come asking why it has failed within the week.  These individuals are likely barely fit to change their spark plugs, let alone deal with a something as complex as an air-conditioning system.  But – don’t lump me into the same oblivious group as them.

If you have any questions regarding proper flushing, you should read the paper in my signature. So far I can see you have no knowledge or understanding about how proper flushing is done and why it is done.

If you wish to make idle threats about the flush agent being responsible for warranty issues, you should contact me directly. Is the bleach responsible for the ruined jeans, or the dumb ass that uses the bleach?

You added a full load of fresh oil onto a full load of contaminated oil; the heat exchangers are loaded with too much oil and thermal transfer is compromised. You saw evidence of burnt oils and debris and with your fantastic automotive abilities and wisdom, you chose to do nothing about it. You insult people offering you good advice, and pound your chest that you know everything. I am not insulting you, just stating a fact; you (your words) cannot be lumped into the same category as them, they listen and learn.

Flush or replace, there is no other option.

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HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 


Edited: Mon July 12, 2010 at 5:37 PM by HECAT

j.davis75 on Mon July 12, 2010 6:50 PM User is offlineView users profile

I stumbled upon this forum because I am trying to gather some information on something that I believe is wrong with my vehicle, also.

A lot of these posts were very informative and helped me out a lot as well as, hopefully, helped the person who started the original post. I just wanted to say 'thank you' to those of you who answered the question with respect and honest replies for it helped me out quite a bit.

As for the rest of the posts that weren't as respectful and helpful; all I have to say is get a life! You are supposed to be helping people with AC questions on an automotive website. Whether nkmhockey is a teenager working a summer job at a fast food restaurant is irrelevant and does not make you better than him in any way, shape or form; he still had a valid question that was in need of a good answer. You could have taken your active knowledge in the matter and put it to use instead of treating someone with complete and utter disrespect. I just find it sad and pathetic that some middle-aged men spend all of their time and efforts on an automotive AC website "bullying" people who do not have as much knowledge as they do.

Kudos to you nkmhockey because you seem to know a lot about what you are talking about and kudos to your wanting to keep this old car's heart beat strong. I, too, have an older car (1995), but do not possess nearly the knowledge that you have on cars.

John Davis

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John Davis

TRB on Mon July 12, 2010 8:54 PM User is offlineView users profile

Mr. Davis, your point is noted. But many here have suggested a path and were told it's not needed. We can only provide the information we believe is correct. If someone cares to listen or not it is up to them. Questioning motives and such is just designed for a pissing match. Bottom line the poster tried to repair the vehicle with the knowledge he or they had. It did not work and he or they came here. It was suggested by more than one what to do. The response is I'm not going to do that or one is just selling parts. That is very rude (my opinion) when no one asked for anyone to buy anything and the people on this forum were providing information at no cost.

The point is there are certain things needed for a proper repair. We have discussed them and even got off course a little with typical forum banter. System has debris! This is bad and needs to be addressed. The condenser has multiple passages. So blowing air through it will not prove a thing. 4 out of the 6 could be plugged and air would still blow though it. Baffles in the hoses will trap some flushing agent. This will harm the oil which will destroy the compressor be it new or the one they have now. Some times Mr. Davis people just want to be told what they want to hear. When they don't get the response they want they attack those with an opposing view. So I repeat, we can provide information and if someone cares to listen we normally help them have a successful repair. With that said Mr. Davis, if you have a question post up a new thread and we will see what we can do for you.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

HECAT on Mon July 12, 2010 10:23 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: j.davis75
Kudos to you nkmhockey because you seem to know a lot about what you are talking about and kudos to your wanting to keep this old car's heart beat strong.  I, too, have an older car (1995), but do not possess nearly the knowledge that you have on cars.John DavisOMG...and you tell others to get a life.Read the two questions asked at the end of the very first post. Which one was the valid one you speak of?

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HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

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