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Low side High- High side low

Davidswain on Wed June 09, 2010 4:03 PM User is offline

Year: 2002
Make: Chev
Model: S-10
Engine Size: 2.2 4cyl
Refrigerant Type: 134-a
Ambient Temp: 80
Pressure Low: 70
Pressure High: 100
Country of Origin: United States

I noticed my a/c was not cooling as well as it did, so I was going to try charging it up a little. Hooked up a manifold gage set and was getting the above readings. Couldn't get any more 134-a into the system. Was told to replace the accumulator and orifice, which I did, evacuated the system, flushed the condenser, and tried recharging. Same result. Not surprised based on what I've learned recently. My question now is whether I have a compressor problem or is my condenser the possible culprit?

TRB on Wed June 09, 2010 4:52 PM User is offlineView users profile

How much refrigerant did you get in the system? Could be a control valve issue.

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Davidswain on Wed June 09, 2010 5:15 PM User is offline

Less than one 14 oz can.

TRB on Wed June 09, 2010 5:20 PM User is offlineView users profile

Probably a control valve then as all you have done is sucked in what you could from the vacuum process. Clutch hub is turning correct?

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com


Edited: Wed June 09, 2010 at 5:20 PM by TRB

Davidswain on Wed June 09, 2010 5:26 PM User is offline

Compressor clutch is engaging. Compressor sounds normal when turning. Is the control valve in the compressor?

TRB on Wed June 09, 2010 5:46 PM User is offlineView users profile

Yes but is replaceable.

Page 23

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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

Davidswain on Wed June 09, 2010 6:42 PM User is offline

Thanks- I now have a project after dinner!

GM Tech on Wed June 09, 2010 7:23 PM User is offline

Good luck with the control valve-- All the V-7s on S-10s I have seen that have pressures like yours have had worn out compressors- I've never found the control valve to be the reason for the no-pumping on the V-7s-- I have seen CVs be bad on a few V-5s. The key to this is what does your oil look like-- is it blackened- or a nice clear green? V-7s will wear the back of the swash plates clear through the bronze, and you will see bronze filings in the oil- dump the oil out of the original A/D to check oil quality.

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

TRB on Wed June 09, 2010 9:33 PM User is offlineView users profile

GMtech is the expert on these so you should certainly look into the concerns that were posted.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

Davidswain on Wed June 09, 2010 10:38 PM User is offline

Pulled the compressor and removed the RCV. The oil in the compressor was clean and clear. Put it all back together so I can drive to work tomorrow. Can an auto a/c shop bench test the compressor if I take it to them? Do they wear out enough to not work without any noticeable indication? I've got more time than money invested so far and am getting a good education about a part of a car I knew nothing about.

Davidswain on Wed June 09, 2010 11:07 PM User is offline

Adding to my education- just realized what A/D meant. Still have the old one, dumped some oil out and it too was clean.
The original orifice was dark but not dirty. Does this info help?

GM Tech on Wed June 09, 2010 11:07 PM User is offline

Take out the drain plug- with compressor off vehicle-- check the oil in the crankcase- look for stinky black goop- if clear and green- then go for the control valve. You typically can't bench check a variable stroke compressor- no way to force it to stroke on the bench.

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

Davidswain on Wed June 09, 2010 11:25 PM User is offline

Thank you. I'll do that tomorrow night after dinner and report back.

Davidswain on Fri June 18, 2010 12:27 PM User is offline

finally getting back with the report I promised.
Pulled the compressor (again) and drained the oil. It was clean and green. Ordered a replacement RCV and then baked in the heat for days waiting for it to arrive.
Popped it in, refilled the compressor w/ the same amount of oil I drained out, pulled a vacuum, recharged the system and I'm back riding in the cool breeze!
Thanks to all here for giving me the advice and courage to tackle this job.

Now I need to start a new thread about my son's '95 Isuzu Trooper and the possible replacement of his compressor clutch coil....

Thanks again!
David

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