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Is there any place that sells the high pressure blow out on a compressor?

stephen4785 on Wed June 09, 2010 3:19 PM User is offline

Im trying to source a place that sells the high pressure blow out that goes on the back of an a/c compressor. Does anyone sell them new?

HVargas on Wed June 09, 2010 7:01 PM User is offlineView users profile

We can get some but we need a Year, Make and Model along with engine size. Usually if it goes off though there is something more serious going on in the system.

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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: Arizona Mobile Air

GM Tech on Wed June 09, 2010 7:16 PM User is offline

All the ones I know of reset themselves- automatically-- if it is leaking at the base, then a new o-ring is in order...

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

NickD on Wed June 09, 2010 9:28 PM User is offline

Pressure relief valve, must be on an older vehicle, they haven't used those for years, like over twenty?

Was replaced by a high pressure cutoff switch in all the new vehicles. Simply shuts down the compressor if the high side reaches a certain point, usually around 390-430 psi. Where this relief valve expels your refrigerant, not good if you are still using R-12, and a fan goes out or something. Expensive.

GM Tech on Wed June 09, 2010 9:57 PM User is offline

NickD-- well we finally caught you-- in that we know something you don't........

HPRV high pressure relief valves are mandatory on all mobile a/c systems- they are most always on the rear of the compressor-or near the disharge port- and have been for more than 30 years-- yes even on 2010 models!-- they are in case there is blockage before the HPCO or the HPCO is inop- strictly as a safety device...

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

NickD on Thu June 10, 2010 6:46 AM User is offline

One of these things, right?



Maybe I knew and just forgot with the constant stress and pain of my recent surgery with loss of sleep. Maybe its time I go to the home. Sorry.

GM Tech on Thu June 10, 2010 7:48 AM User is offline

I'm about to go there too...How about we take turns pushing each other's wheelchairs?

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

bohica2xo on Thu June 10, 2010 10:40 AM User is offline

GM Tech:

I have seen many of the old steel valves with the aluminum plunger & carbon steel spring fail to re-seal. Usually they are corroded, but I have found one that was just full of road dirt. Usually they whistle at about 80 psi on N2... Old Fords seem to be the worst ones.

It always irked me that the valve is allowed to be used like that. The damn thing should short circuit the pump, and keep the refrigerant in the sealed system. The HPRV should be part of the pump head. Even the cheapest hydraulic system does not spit hydraulic fluid on the ground when the relief valve opens. A mechanic can be fined for letting go of a couple of ounces - but the system vents to atmosphere. Perhaps the compressor engineers need a threat of a federal felony charge like the mechanics?

B.

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"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

NickD on Thu June 10, 2010 11:38 AM User is offline

Quote
I'm about to go there too...How about we take turns pushing each other's wheelchairs?

Was thinking more in terms of a nut house.

Good old EPA, when they came out with that average passenger car vehicle losing 10% of R-134a per year with 50% for commercial vehicles report, just gave a very mild, if you have time, or can think about it, or maybe or maybe not, perhaps, if of no inconvenience to you whatsoever, maybe you can attempt to reduce these numbers to the OE's. But you really don't have to.

ice-n-tropics on Thu June 10, 2010 1:29 PM User is offline

SAE mandated the HPRV as a fail safe so that the discharge hose would not burst and hurt someone. Cabable engingeers aim the PRV to release in a direction which will not injure a mechanic.
Most start to relieve abnormal pressure above 500 up to 600 psi
Salt on roads corrodes the PRV spring and seat, therefore the relief hole is often covered with a stick on foil cover or other cover.
After pop off the seat becomes contaminated with debris and subsequent relief pressure is often below spec
Comp manufacturers pay about a half buck for a HPRV and it is easy to R&R, therefore they don't incorporate it into the compressor machined parts
Cordially,
hotrodac

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Isentropic Efficiency=Ratio of Theoretical Compression Energy/Actual Energy.
AMAZON.com: How To Air Condition Your Hot Rod

bohica2xo on Thu June 10, 2010 1:54 PM User is offline

Yep. Sounds like a $25,000 fine per venting event would move that check ball & spring right inside the compressor. The rules should apply equally.

Engineers. The threaded port for the "50 cent" valve is just as much machine work as a ball seat inside the compressor. Just a poor design, and none of them want to say so.

B.

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"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

TRB on Thu June 10, 2010 2:23 PM User is offlineView users profile

Tim grabs bag of popcorn as sits back to watch the debate!

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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

ice-n-tropics on Thu June 10, 2010 2:39 PM User is offline

bohica2xo w/ 3204 posts!
You da man.
See Tim, Metallurgist can think like practical Engineer
Cordially,
hotrodac

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Isentropic Efficiency=Ratio of Theoretical Compression Energy/Actual Energy.
AMAZON.com: How To Air Condition Your Hot Rod

ice-n-tropics on Thu June 10, 2010 5:07 PM User is offline

TRB
Pop Boringer said for you to hurry up and eat your pop corn on the job and earn your keep and to personally operate the thermo vacuum former for the next 10 weeks
Been there done that. Better start work at 3 AM.
hotrodac

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Isentropic Efficiency=Ratio of Theoretical Compression Energy/Actual Energy.
AMAZON.com: How To Air Condition Your Hot Rod

TRB on Thu June 10, 2010 5:15 PM User is offlineView users profile

HA, Pop does not tell me what is needed to do anymore. I would like to get out of my hell hole aka office! Would be enjoyable to work on some projects instead of pushing papers all day. I guess each has their spot around here and mine is to create as much shredded paper products as I can.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

NickD on Thu June 10, 2010 6:35 PM User is offline

Back on track now, when I posted my reply last night was thinking about the pressure relief valves used over twenty years ago as the only means to protect the system as no HPCO switches were used. Now we are talking about the additional fail-safe valve that blows at a much higher pressure in the event the HPCO switch, thermistor, or doorknob does not work.

BTW, those 50 cent fail-safe valves run around 30 bucks around here and since they are mounted on a red hot spot, those O'rings don't last very long. O'ring is the major protector, lets all the refrigerant leak out so you will never hit that super high pressure.

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