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How to flush system

ariff on Tue May 18, 2010 11:18 PM User is offline

Hey guys,
Well I just picked up my 2001 Cherokee from the shop and the compressor is bad. It is leaking from the pressure relief valve and front by the clutch. They quoted me 800 bucks to fix it including parts and labor. Well I politely declined. I had them evacuate the system for me and I'll replace the compressor, Dryer, and orifice tube myself. My mechanic was really cool and told me what to do. He said he'll even let me borrow his quick disconnect tool for the lines when I need to. He recommended flushing the system once the dryer, orifice tube and compressor were removed. So my question is how a backyard mechanic like myself can properly do this? So can anyone help me get these old worn parts off, system flushed and new stuff installed? I figure once I have all the parts replaced I'll take the truck back down to my mechanic and have him vacuum the system and re charge it for me. Thanks for any assistance.. A\C weather is coming up real quick

Edited: Tue May 18, 2010 at 11:27 PM by ariff

robs on Tue May 18, 2010 11:28 PM User is offlineView users profile

I would recommend reading THIS to get an understanding of proper flushing procedures and what components need to be replaced specially when dealing with 134a systems.

Edited: Tue May 18, 2010 at 11:44 PM by robs

TRB on Wed May 19, 2010 12:04 AM User is offlineView users profile

Rob's link and also make sure to read Hecat's tech paper. It's in his signature.

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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
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HECAT on Wed May 19, 2010 6:03 AM User is offline

Following up on the comments from the guys at AMA; read the article in my signature. Doing so will answer a lot of your questions.

Your mechanic understands the importance (and maybe saw something concerning) of proper lubrication. A considerable amount of old oils (and other junk) will reside in the condenser, evaporator, and lines after you remove the stated parts. To reuse these components will require them to be clean and DRY before installing the new parts, so you can add the proper amount of fresh oil.

Study this and do it right. Failure to do so means you may be doing it again. At which time $800.00 will not seem to have been such a bad deal.



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HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

ariff on Wed May 19, 2010 6:02 PM User is offline

Thanks so much for the links.. Upon more research I found a post on a Jeep forum that states:
The 2001 has a parallel flow condenser with very small holes which is impossible to flush.
Is this statement true? Would there be a way I can replace the parts and drive the car to the shop and have my mechanic do the flush? I am pretty sure I can replace all the parts. It's the flushing and vacuume\recharge I feel more comfortable letting my mechanic do.. I don't have a lot of money floating around and I want to try to do what I can to save money. But I want to do it right as well. Thanks for any help..

TRB on Wed May 19, 2010 7:17 PM User is offlineView users profile

Check with the shop you plan to do the flushing and make sure they know what they are doing! As you read each component needs to be flushed separately. So a shop may not want you putting things on as they may need to take it off anyway.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

bohica2xo on Wed May 19, 2010 11:29 PM User is offline

Lots of things can be flushed. The question is should they be? It becomes a value call. A new condensor is about 130 bucks.

The orifice tube is the primary filter in the system. If it is not broken, the evaporator should not be full of debris. The evaporator is a lot harder to remove too. It can be flushed to remove the old oils in place.

If the compressor is leaking from both ends, the pulley bearing & clutch are probably tired too. A new compressor is less than 265 bucks.

If this was my vehicle I would replace the condensor, compressor, drier & orifice tube. Around 450 bucks in parts. Mostly your labor. Either flush the condensor yourself, or pay someone to do it.

Then you will be back to OEM performance. A known quantity of oil in the system, and new parts. Be sure to check the condensor fans for proper operation.

B.

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"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

HECAT on Thu May 20, 2010 6:26 AM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: ariff
Thanks so much for the links.. Upon more research I found a post on a Jeep forum that states:

The 2001 has a parallel flow condenser with very small holes which is impossible to flush.

Is this statement true?

This is a very common and generic statement that I do not agree with, but understand why it is said.

After many of the simple, minimalistic, and inexpensive attempts with "pour in-blow out" chemicals and little "poof can" methods have failed to work; this design of condenser has been heralded as impossible to flush. It is also near impossible to air up an automotive tire by blowing in it with your lips, does this mean it is impossible to air up the tire?

I think such a statement should be written with more clarity, such as... "If you don't have a deeper understanding of the component design, what is in there, how it entered, or the necessary tooling, to properly flush the small passages of a parallel flow condenser; it should be replaced".

Flush (properly and confirm) or replace are the only two choices to achieve clean, clear, and dry. Do not install any new parts until this cleaning is done on all pieces that are to be reused.

I must admit it has often cost me more to "learn the hard way" how to do things myself, than it would have to pay a Pro.

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HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

ariff on Thu May 20, 2010 3:43 PM User is offline

Great info guys. The more I am thinking about it the more I think I'll have my mechanic flush the system. So let me ask you this. Can I remove the old Accumulator and orifice tube leaving the evaporator and condenser open to the elements. leave the compressor installed since it is driven with the serp. belt. Drive the truck to the shop and have them flush the system. Then pickup the truck and install the new parts, take it back down and have them vacuume and charge the system? The one thing I do feel comfortable with is replacing the parts. So if I don't have to pay my mechanic to do this all the better.

HECAT on Fri May 21, 2010 9:32 AM User is offline

I would run this by your "cool" mechanic.



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HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

ariff on Fri May 21, 2010 10:11 AM User is offline

Stopped by yesterday and talked to my mechanic. He was "cool" with doing this. I don't think I can properly flush the system with the tools I have. Which would be a cheap bottle of flush from the Auto parts store. He said it would cost me around 60 bucks to do it. Does this sound like a reasonable price?

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