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Regas, Adding oil?

Z2TT on Wed November 18, 2009 2:22 AM User is offline

Year: 1987
Make: Toyota
Model: Soarer
Engine Size: 2.0l
Refrigerant Type: R12

A person who is going to regas my aircon said he doesn't add oil unless I have had the compressor overhauled before the regas. He says the old oil would still be there in the compressors sump.

Now I'm wondering

1. Since he is going to use a vacuum pump to evac the system, wouldn't most of the oil be sucked out, requiring new oil to be put in anyway?

2. Does my compressor even have a sump? This is the first time I hear of him mentioning compressor sumps. I have a Nippon Denso 10PA Compressor from a Toyota, similar to this one :

http://www.alibaba.com/product-gs/23...mpressors.html

So I don't know whether it's safe to let him just put gas in the system, because my thinking tells me during the evacuation proccess most of the oil would be removed.

Thanks.

HECAT on Wed November 18, 2009 6:01 AM User is offline

Refrigerant oil does not evaporate. The refrigerant can be removed as a gas (slowly) and it will leave all the oil behind. The system can be pulled into deep vacuum and it will not remove the oil. The oil circulates and migrates with the refrigerant, and upon shutdown is distributed (laying) all thru the system regardless of the compressors design (sump or no sump).

Slow leaks can push some oil out, and rapid recovery machines that pull liquid can bring out some oil; but usually very little. If you have replaced any components, this will remove the amount of oil that was laying in that part. Issues such as this would require adding back some oil to compensate for the loss.

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JACK ADAMS on Wed November 18, 2009 11:00 AM User is offline

What is the reason for re-gassing the system? Do you have a leak? If so the leak must be fixed prior to a re-charge. Catastrophic failures are caused by lack of oil and with a leak that can seep out oil, over time you will end up with compressor failure. So fix the leak first prior to a recharge.

Z2TT on Wed November 18, 2009 11:33 AM User is offline

Hi,

I had leaks in 5 different places, one was from the EPR valve and would leak quite a lot of oil out.
I have since replaced the low pressure hose and the EPR Valve, Reciever/drier, Evaporator,
and Compressor.

The only component in my A/C System that would still have some oil left in it would be the condenser.
and maybe some in the high pressure side line going from the condensor to the TXV Valve.

I would say 150ml's of oil should be added back, what do you guys recon?

JACK ADAMS on Wed November 18, 2009 11:48 AM User is offline

Prior to evacuation and charging, you may as well flush the condenser or replace it and start off with a new system with the proper amount of oil. Not familiar with this application model but adding in the proper amount of oil and R-12 you should be good for a long time.

HECAT on Thu November 19, 2009 6:41 AM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: Z2TT
Hi,



I had leaks in 5 different places, one was from the EPR valve and would leak quite a lot of oil out. I have since replaced the low pressure hose and the EPR Valve, Reciever/drier, Evaporator, and Compressor. The only component in my A/C System that would still have some oil left in it would be the condenser and maybe some in the high pressure side line going from the condenser to the TXV Valve. I would say 150ml's of oil should be added back, what do you guys recon?

You have invested a lot of time, expense, and effort to get this system repaired and close to being back up and running. IMHO, its seems to cheapen (and also put at risk) all that effort and expense by resorting to guessing how much old oil remains, and how much new oil, is to be used in this system.

I do not know the reason you changed the compressor. Most compressor replacements are due to a breakage or leak, this means that the lube circulation may have been compromised resulting in overheating and lube burnout. These burnt oils and oil residues will go straight into the condenser. If there was any metal debris involved, it has now lodged in the inlet chamber and passageways; where it can be bound by "sticky" burnt oils. So how much oil is in the condenser, and how clean or dirty is it?

Flush or replace the condenser would be my recommendation to complete the process. Rotate the compressor (may need to remove again) to drain all the oil possible. These steps would make the repair more complete (clean, dry, and empty); where you can begin to distribute the factory prescribed complete new oil load, and eliminate the guess.

Go back and check your formula used to determine 150 ML. Make sure you can verify the numbers.

-------------------------


HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

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