Automotive Air Conditioning Information Forum (Archives)

Provided by www.ACkits.com

We've updated our forums!
Click here to visit the new forum

Archive Home

Search Auto AC Forum Archives

Crimped evaporator discharge tube Pages: 12

ScotY on Sat October 03, 2009 1:43 AM User is offlineView users profile

Year: 88
Make: Suzuki
Model: Samurai

Do you guys think this tube is still usable? The part is no longer available new and I can't find a good used one (still looking)...seems everyone who removes them fails to use a second wrench on the fitting and the tube gets twisted. It's the discharge tube off an OEM '88 Suzuki evaporator. I would guess and say it's crimped about 50% of how it should be. Also, anyone know if this is an o-ring fitting? I know it's metric thread but don't know if it's a typical o-ring fitting. It looks like it is.





AMA guys...do you have metric fittings?

Thanks, Scot

TRB on Sat October 03, 2009 11:04 AM User is offlineView users profile

I would not use it as it could restrict the flow to some degree. We have metric fittings available to some degree.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

ScotY on Sat October 03, 2009 8:52 PM User is offlineView users profile

The metric fittings I need are:
M14-1.5 straight, for #6 hose
M22-1.5 straight, for #10 hose

Is there any way to make a new tube like this? I've seen what I think is bendable aluminum tube and braze fittings on another website. I am still looking for a good used one though.

HVargas on Mon October 05, 2009 3:55 PM User is offlineView users profile

Suzuki Samuri 86-94 Evap

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: Arizona Mobile Air

ScotY on Mon October 05, 2009 5:32 PM User is offlineView users profile

Unfortunately, the tube is connected to the evaporator, it's not actually part of the evaporator core.

TRB on Mon October 05, 2009 5:38 PM User is offlineView users profile

Tube should be attached to the expansion valve not the core itself according to the image Adam posted, which is for an 88 model.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com


Edited: Mon October 05, 2009 at 5:38 PM by TRB

ScotY on Mon October 05, 2009 6:25 PM User is offlineView users profile

Hey Tim,

I am fairly certain all years are the same. Here's a pic. The tube that's crimped is the one labeled #7.


Edited: Mon October 05, 2009 at 6:26 PM by ScotY

TRB on Mon October 05, 2009 7:11 PM User is offlineView users profile

Right so all you need is a replacement tube.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

ScotY on Mon October 05, 2009 8:37 PM User is offlineView users profile

Yes, but they're no longer available new and I haven't yet found a good used one. Still searching the net for used. I plan to replace the evap core and txv. Do you guys sell a bender and the appropriate tubing, fittings, etc.?

ScotY on Mon October 05, 2009 8:37 PM User is offlineView users profile

Yes, but they're no longer available new and I haven't yet found a good used one. Still searching the net for used. I plan to replace the evap core and txv. Do you guys sell a bender and the appropriate tubing, fittings, etc.?

TRB on Mon October 05, 2009 10:57 PM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: ScotY
Yes, but they're no longer available new and I haven't yet found a good used one. Still searching the net for used. I plan to replace the evap core and txv. Do you guys sell a bender and the appropriate tubing, fittings, etc.?

Sure don't.

-------------------------
When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

JACK ADAMS on Tue October 06, 2009 1:24 PM User is offline

If you wish to send it into us, I may be able to get it straightened out for you. Not the first one we have done and I’m sure it will not be the last. The only other option would be a junkyard hunt. Just give us a call if you wish to send it in.


Good Luck.

NickD on Tue October 06, 2009 6:32 PM User is offline

I use my double flaring set to handle small crimps, not that thingy that looks like a C clamp to form the flare, but that thingy that holds and locks the tubing, start from the unkinked sides and slowly work toward the center using those thumb screws and take it slow just compressing the tubing tads at a time. If the outside folds over the kink and you keep on tightening the thumb screws, you are dead meat. Takes patience and a watchful eye, and luck.

In production, they fill that straight tube with sand, heat it, then bend it. If a kink does form, pitch it and try again.

Could do the math, the circumference does not change, but comparing the area of a circle with that of an oval and taking the ratio of the area of the oval with a circle, normally not that much with a smaller kink. Course the best way, is to avoid kinking it, that also takes patience with badly corroded fittings and trying to put two large tube fitting wrenches in impossible to reach areas. From your photo, that kink looks like a challenge, would try heating it first then try to straighten it out slowly before working out the kink. Best to remove that hose and all that rubber first, and use plenty of PB blaster so you don't wreck the other end. Or send it to Jack.

ScotY on Wed October 07, 2009 4:57 AM User is offlineView users profile

Nick,
Thanks for the tips. I've looked at it and puzzled through a way to unkink it and I think I'd just ruin it. If I could find a junk one to practice on, I might just to that and see how well I do.

Jack,
Thanks for the reply. I am still searching for a good used one but if I can't find one, it's good to know that you guys can probably fix it. Will get in touch if needed.

NickD on Wed October 07, 2009 9:18 AM User is offline

Who broke it? Or is that classified information. If I even have to fool with a heater hose, cut it off with a new blade in a utility knife, don't even try to work it off and replace the hose. Favorite phrase is, just want to remove it, don't want to wreck it. Easier said than done.

ScotY on Wed October 07, 2009 1:47 PM User is offlineView users profile

I bought the entire evaporator used and the rubber outer concealed the damage. Previous owner failed to use a wrench on the sides and bent the tube.

HVargas on Wed October 07, 2009 2:42 PM User is offlineView users profile

What was the reason for not using the evaporator and hoses provided in the kit you bought?

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: Arizona Mobile Air

ScotY on Thu October 08, 2009 1:36 PM User is offlineView users profile

Hi Adam,

I am currently using the evaporator that was included in the AMA kit...works fine. Two reasons for wanting to use the OEM unit. First, I'm swapping engines and it would be easier to have the lines exit lower on the firewall. The AMA kit evap lines are high up on the firewall, OEM evap lines are at the bottom. Second, I was told by a very experienced mechanic that I might want to try an OEM evap unit, that a serpentine evap sometimes works better. I wasn't given a reason and I don't know enough to know why he suggested this. He's no longer around so can't ask him the reasons why. In any case, all the stuff I do is for the learning/knowledge so I don't mind experimenting.

iceman2555 on Thu October 08, 2009 5:27 PM User is offlineView users profile

If this pipe is so important, why not simply located the correct inlet and outlet fittings (type used for making AC hoses), the correct size alum tube and bend the pipe to specifications. Weld the fittings into the new alum pipe. Re insulate the tube, covering the weld marks with insulation and there ya are....one new metal A/C line. Another repair, check the routings first, would be to simply construct a flexible AC line with new fittings and use this instead. Heck, find some brass tubing, the correct fittings and use that. This does not seem to be a insurmountable problem. With all the gobbledegook going on...the darn thing could already have been repaired.

-------------------------
The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.
Thomas Jefferson

TRB on Thu October 08, 2009 5:36 PM User is offlineView users profile

As Iceman has stated just make a new line. Fittings can be located as well as tubing and tubing benders.

Tube Bender Equipment

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

HVargas on Thu October 08, 2009 5:50 PM User is offlineView users profile

If you want to you can send us the old one and we can replicate it with rubber line. Might be better for your engine swap anyways since it will give you some room to move it around.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: Arizona Mobile Air

Back to Automotive Air Conditioning Forum

We've updated our forums!
Click here to visit the new forum

Archive Home

Copyright © 2016 Arizona Mobile Air Inc.