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fan works sometimes

fonebone on Sat July 18, 2009 1:14 AM User is offline

Year: 1997
Make: buick
Model: lesabre
Engine Size: 3800
Refrigerant Type: 134
Ambient Temp: n/a
Pressure Low: n/a
Pressure High: n/a
Country of Origin: United States

A Buick owner says her fan speeds do not come on right away when using A/C, but takes several minutes before it kicks in. It is not a ATC unit, but manual control. Tried moving a few harness connectors, but no go. Couldn't spend much time on it. Any ideas what it could be? Thanks

Chick on Sat July 18, 2009 7:48 AM User is offlineView users profile

Dead spot in the blower motor? bad resistor?

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Chick
Email: Chick

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Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

GM Tech on Sat July 18, 2009 8:35 AM User is offline

Next time it is slow to come on---tap (or whaaappp, or kick) the blower motor---if it comes on-- time for a new blower motor...also check connections for hot spots while you're in there...

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

NickD on Sat July 18, 2009 9:43 AM User is offline

Fan or blower motor, infers the blower motor where the fan is related to the engine. Seen cooked connectors at the resistor block, and if the vehicle has more than 60K on it, can certainly suspect the blower motor itself. Too bad you can't see the brushes to determine if they are at the end of there live. Can certainly spin the blower wheel, that cold rolled steel shaft sure loves to rust and bind. Can't even remove the blower wheel without breaking, plastic and gets very brittle with age. Blower motor switch itself is bare copper with harden grease on it and green contacts. Those can be repaired if that high blower motor current didn't warp the plastic yet. But if it's bad, can't even replace the switch, takes a very special tool like a phillips screwdriver to remove two screws, so they make you buy the entire climate control panel.

Typically GM uses a high speed relay where the switch only has to energized the coil, but does offer a different path to the motor, but can play with the switch to see if it's erratic. The fuse and connectors can also be corroded, but leave tell-tale signs of burning due to the high blower motor currents.

fonebone on Sat July 18, 2009 5:40 PM User is offline

Thanks, all; I'll try kicking, tapping, and whaaaping that blower motor first

fonebone on Sat July 25, 2009 8:02 PM User is offline

Hey GMTech; One light tap on the blower motor and it roared back to life! Also checked the connector, and it seemed secure. Showed the lady how to do it and she said she had a hammer in her trunk. She said it was a lot cheaper than having a garage take her to the cleaners. Got a good laugh on that

GM Tech on Sat July 25, 2009 8:44 PM User is offline

I had a woman kick hers for nearly a year until she finally gave up and let me replace it.....sure is an easy diagnosis when they do the work for you....

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

fonebone on Sun July 26, 2009 2:59 AM User is offline

By the way, not that I feel THAT ambitious, but how much work is it to replace that blower motor?

GM Tech on Sun July 26, 2009 7:51 AM User is offline

Piece of Cake-- maybe 20 miutes- tops

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

NickD on Sun July 26, 2009 9:29 AM User is offline

When these were six bucks a piece, MSRP, had screws on them, could be easily taken apart and a set of brushes were available for around 25 cents. Armature shaft was always rusty and the wick bone dry, that could be cleaned and oiled. Today, a second mortgage, and strictly a throwaway item, welded and the blower wheel, now brittle and hot stamped on.

But I still rip them apart and save the magnets, have a steel cabinet next to my work bench they cling to. Handing to slide a screwdriver tip several times to magnetized the end of it so it will hold a screw, at least you are getting some use out of it. Rest goes in the trashcan.

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