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suction line broken for at least a year

joe45 on Mon March 30, 2009 9:56 AM User is offline

Year: 01
Make: cadillac
Model: seville
Refrigerant Type: r134a
Country of Origin: United States

I have a 01 Seville STS which are know for having the center motor mounts fail which was the case when I purchased mine used. The previous owner said the A/C never worked in the year that he had owned it. In my investigation I found that the suction line to the compressor from the accumulator broke completely off right at the compressor due to the excessive motor twist. I replaced the mount and ordered a new suction line, accumulator and orifice tube but my question is what are the odds of the compressor being shot after being exposed to the environment for so long? I briefly jumpered the relay and the clutch still engages. I plan on flushing the system and removing the compressor to flush with new oil. Any other suggestions?

TRB on Mon March 30, 2009 12:02 PM User is offlineView users profile

Compressor if not run during that time would not really be harmed. Removing the oil from the system and getting fresh oil added would be an important piece of the puzzle in my opinion.

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joe45 on Mon March 30, 2009 1:07 PM User is offline

The compressor can't run unless you jumper the relay so do you think I should still remove it and flush the oil? Getting that thing off is a real treat on a cadi.

bohica2xo on Mon March 30, 2009 1:30 PM User is offline

Ah, but the compressor DID run. You made sure of that. It had a chance to suck in whatever road dirt was sitting in the inlet port...

That system is full of PAG oil, that has been sucking up moisture from the atmosphere for at least a year. You need to get ALL of the old oil out, and flush that compressor well. The balance of the system should be flushed to bare metal.

That is an expensive compressor. Trying to save it would be a priority, unless you want to spend over 500 bucks on a new one.

B.

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"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

joe45 on Mon March 30, 2009 1:32 PM User is offline

That true. I only want to do this once.

TRB on Mon March 30, 2009 1:36 PM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: bohica2xo
Ah, but the compressor DID run. You made sure of that. It had a chance to suck in whatever road dirt was sitting in the inlet port...



That system is full of PAG oil, that has been sucking up moisture from the atmosphere for at least a year. You need to get ALL of the old oil out, and flush that compressor well. The balance of the system should be flushed to bare metal.



That is an expensive compressor. Trying to save it would be a priority, unless you want to spend over 500 bucks on a new one.



B.

Agreed...

OP: Check the Hecat flushing articles in the Hecat forum on this site.



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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

joe45 on Mon March 30, 2009 1:41 PM User is offline

I did, I have them all printed out.

Chick on Mon March 30, 2009 7:00 PM User is offlineView users profile

Just to add, that compressor should be removed to flush with new oil.. It could be a tough one to remove, but looks harder than it is. It comes out the right fender well after you remove the plastic splash shield. The rear bolt on the manifold can be the hardest. I remove the oil sending unit. I only had to break one to learn that... Use a long extension and socket. It may slip once or twice (again, remove the oil sending unit..) and the rest is easy.. Run the new oil thru it, turning the outer hub while pouring it in, then pump it out the same way.. but you need to get that moisture laden oil out.. Hope this helps..

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Chick
Email: Chick

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Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

joe45 on Tue March 31, 2009 8:13 AM User is offline

OK cool, I have had the oil filter deal off before to change out the CKP sensors so that’s not a problem. One other question. I had planned on using a peristaltic pump to due the flushing. From what I read you want to flush the condenser coil from the bottom up correct?

HECAT on Wed April 01, 2009 6:06 AM User is offline

Normally you would want to backflush (bottom-up) a condenser; to back out debris from a compressor failure that cannot be pushed through the small passages. IMHO, this will require more volume and velocity the the pump you plan to use may be able to do. This is why many heavily debris loaded condensers are replaced. However, since an excessive debris issue from a failure may not be a concern with this repair; I would backflush first (just to be sure), then I would flush in the normal flow direction (top-down), and finally to air purge in this same direction (top-down). Make sure you use a compatible evaporative chemical cleaner which requires you to be "smarter than the label", and follow up with dry air (paint booth quality) to purge (remove solvent) for at least 20 to 30 minutes. Be sure to test with the "pop" method to verify all oils and solvents have been removed. Many of these techniques and issues are further explained in the "Flushing Technical Article" you may have already downloaded and printed. Good Luck with your repair.

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FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

joe45 on Wed April 01, 2009 9:20 AM User is offline

Yep got it, going to give a try this weekend.

joe45 on Mon April 06, 2009 9:46 AM User is offline

The compressor is shot, anyone know where to find a good rebuilt one for a cadi?

HECAT on Mon April 06, 2009 10:34 AM User is offline

HERE

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FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

Chick on Mon April 06, 2009 2:29 PM User is offlineView users profile

Check out 01 seville AC parts and don't forget the accumulator and O tube..hope this helps..

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Chick
Email: Chick

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Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

NickD on Tue April 07, 2009 6:59 AM User is offline

Quote
Check out 01 seville AC parts and don't forget the accumulator and O tube..hope this helps..

All that stuff on that cited webpage with a rebuilt compressor and a new condenser only adds up to 475 bucks, but that would be less that suction line, don't know what that would cost, haven't seen it. Even tossed in a new orifice for 88 cents, those are not easy to clean either.

Not easy to flush out a condenser in the vehicle, just replace the darn thing, and when that's out, remove the radiator also and get that flushed out, it more than likely needs that too. That will give you a lot of extra space to change your compressor.

That just leaves your lines and evaporator to clean, normally not too bad of a job.

NickD on Tue April 07, 2009 7:03 AM User is offline

Forgot to mention, many people come to this board after paying a shop 1,500 to 2,500 bucks to repair their AC system and it still doesn't work, now that I consider expensive. Sure someone can make oil recommendations that isn't nearly so moisture prone as PAG, if I have to use it, like to draw a deep vacuum first, and inject it into the high side port, that is how the factory does it.

GM Tech on Tue April 07, 2009 9:35 AM User is offline

Nick- All compressor supplier/manufacturers supply the entire system OEM oil charge in their compressors to the factory- that way they are responsible if the system has oil or not--The assembly plants only introduce refrigerant (by hydraulic syringe-volume) through the high side port- No assembly plants that I have been in ever introduce the oil-- would take too long anyway...this is why I always gaff when folks say to put the oil throughout the system- on a repair- talk about wive's tales...- when I know that every compressor ever put on a car started its life with the entire 8 ounces (or whatever spec) in the compressor itself- and it is soon expelled at engine start and a/c commanded on...

The compressor on the OP's caddy is a Mitsubishi scroll- I personally have never seen them trash themselves- at least enough to cause condenser blockage-- the only reason I would consider to flush is to clear the system of the old moisture laden oil.

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

NickD on Tue April 07, 2009 12:11 PM User is offline

OP said his compressor was trash, honestly wouldn't know what I would do if my suction line broke on my Caddy, not until I look it over, we only have words to go by.

joe45 on Wed April 15, 2009 3:26 PM User is offline

Got my rebuild compressor installed along with another orifice tube and accumulator. I put a vacuum on it for an hour or so before recharging. Works great now! Thanks Guys!

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