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vacum/pressure testing of evaporator

jagrov on Fri October 17, 2008 7:14 PM User is offline

Year: 1971
Make: Jaguar
Model: XJ6
Engine Size: 307sbc
Country of Origin: Australia

Hello all,

To ensure that my evaporator unit does not leak before I put it back in the car, I want to test it - mainly because the evap unit in the series one XJ6 is requires the whole dash assembly to come out to gain access. I have made up some beadlock fittings with a 1/4 inch service port to seal off the high side and low side of the evap. Is pulling a vacuum and making sure it holds for a long time a good enough test, or should I get it pressurized with nitrogen and tested for leakage?

Thanks,

James.

Chick on Fri October 17, 2008 7:28 PM User is offlineView users profile

Pressurize it and stick it in a tub of water, like the tube leak procedure.. Water won't hurt it, as it will hopefully be dripping water for years to come... hope this helps..
PS> Not so much pressure as to split the seams though....

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Chick
Email: Chick

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Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

iceman2555 on Fri October 17, 2008 7:39 PM User is offlineView users profile

Just to add another $.02 worth, be sure to flush all lubricants from the core prior to testing. Residual lubes may actually conceal a leak. Dunkin' in water is a good test...however, add a bit of alcohol into the water....this aids in detection of leaks.
Good luck!!!

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The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.
Thomas Jefferson

Chick on Fri October 17, 2008 8:13 PM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: iceman2555
Just to add another $.02 worth, be sure to flush all lubricants from the core prior to testing. Residual lubes may actually conceal a leak. Dunkin' in water is a good test...however, add a bit of alcohol into the water....this aids in detection of leaks.

Good luck!!!

Wow, never heard of the acohol..Will Jack Danials do?? .....

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Chick
Email: Chick

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Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

Dougflas on Fri October 17, 2008 10:45 PM User is offline

You want to waste Jack Daniels for testing?

jagrov on Fri October 17, 2008 11:09 PM User is offline

Hi guys,
thanks for the quick reply.
The series one XJ6 evap is a older style copper tube and fin unit in a large fiberglass housing / air ducting assembly which is all riveted together, disassembling it would be a major PITA, hence my approach for vac or pressure & leaving it for a long time - this is a project car at home so I ca leave it hooked up to my manifold gauges for as long as need be, I would really prefer not to pull it out of its housing if possible. evap has been flushed previously..

Thanks,

James

bohica2xo on Sat October 18, 2008 10:56 AM User is offline

I understand the desire to leave the evaporator in place on that vehicle. Iceman's recomendation to flush it well is a good place to start.

Once it is clean, pull a vacuum with your test setup, and see if it appears leak free for 24 hours.

For pressure testing, I would pressureize it with a tiny bit of R290. A nice high vapor pressure, and easy to detect with the MkI olfactory detector... Close the car up and check it in a day or so.

B.

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"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

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