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Denso 7seu16c Spare Parts

Pete.L on Wed September 24, 2008 10:33 AM User is offline

Country of Origin: United Kingdom

I've replaced a number of these direct drive compressors in the past 12 months, where the compressors have been fine, but the shear plate mechanism in the pulley has failed - possibly through engine heat and its effect on the plastic "plate". I've asked around the UK, but the only option is to buy replacement compressors, just wondered if these assemblies are available in the US. I'd like to be able to just buy the plastic section which I could then rivet onto the pulley assembly.

I've replaced these on cars with 60 to 80,000 miles on the clock and from 2002/2003 and 2004 vehicles and it's Audis, Mercedes and Toyotas so not vehicle specific. I am sure others have seen the same thing.

Is anyone aware of any suppliers?

Chick on Thu September 25, 2008 7:12 AM User is offlineView users profile

Here is a link to DENSO Europe you can click on "where to buy" or try to find a contact form for them to see where you can buy new clutches.. Problem is that they may cost more than a reman compressor, but it won't hurt to check..Hope this helps..

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Chick
Email: Chick

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Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

Pete.L on Mon September 29, 2008 3:25 PM User is offline

Thanks Chick, I had already tried this route, comes up with Autoclimate for the uk, I use them for parts occasionally. Unfortunately, they do not sell parts only complete units for Denso.

I suspect that parts are available in the US, I was hoping to get a lead on someone in the US. My irritation is that I don't like junking a perfectly good compressor just because the clutch has failed.

Chick on Mon September 29, 2008 8:31 PM User is offlineView users profile

I'm sure you can buy clutch assembly's here, but they tend to be expensive. How about finding out which cars use that compressor (can't do interchange on foreign cars from my books) and visit your local wrecking yard and buy all the used clutches you can find from those cars. Clean them up and use them on good compressors? Just a thought, I do it all the time in the Yard I work out of..When a car is being stripped, I take good clutch assemblies, put them on a shelf, and sell them when a repair comes in that just needs a clutch.. The customer saves a lot of money that way, and the way the economy is going, might be using more of them...

You can also try this site: If denso makes it, we can sell it and send them an e-mail, wether they sell outside the USA I don't know, but sometimes these companies can give you a lead to follow..worth a shot... good luck

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Chick
Email: Chick

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Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

Edited: Mon September 29, 2008 at 8:40 PM by Chick

bohica2xo on Mon September 29, 2008 8:50 PM User is offline

Ah, the damn plastic starfish. I always thought that clutchless wonder was going to end up doing this sort of thing... but I expected it would be here in the desert. Must be the cold weather is harder on the plate.

For those that are wondering what we are talking about:





Might be a market for a metal replacment. How may do you see fail?

B.

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"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

Matt L on Mon September 29, 2008 8:53 PM User is offline

I'd hate to have a compressor lock up with a metal replacement in there.

bohica2xo on Mon September 29, 2008 9:00 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: Matt L
I'd hate to have a compressor lock up with a metal replacement in there.

Really? Why? Compressors lock up all the time - sometimes it is the idler bearing in the pulley, which no clutch or breakaway will release. All you risk is a broken belt - the compressor is already junk. Besides, a metal unit could be designed to shear just as easily as a plastic unit.

B.



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"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

Chick on Mon September 29, 2008 9:02 PM User is offlineView users profile

If I get one in, you can bet I'll find a denso clutch and pulley to work, the inside diameter of the bearing needs to be the same, and of course coil clearance etc, but they usually only have two or three bearing sizes, unlike GM's one.. And it would be the rubber break away, not metal.. GM used metal clutch drivers for years, I don't see a big advantage of the plastic break away hubs, especially if they don't service the part reasonably... I already use a regular Denso clutch assembly on 96 and up Caravan/voyager with the 3.3 engine. They have a rubbere break away, and most other denso's clutches will work fine, just don't look as pretty as that BIG hub on the outer surface..... Just my opinion..

But looking at Bohica's pic, is that a direct drive (on all the time) coiless compressor? As I said I haven't seen one yet...

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Chick
Email: Chick

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Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

Edited: Mon September 29, 2008 at 9:04 PM by Chick

Matt L on Mon September 29, 2008 9:35 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: bohica2xo
Quote
Originally posted by: Matt L
I'd hate to have a compressor lock up with a metal replacement in there.



Really? Why? Compressors lock up all the time - sometimes it is the idler bearing in the pulley, which no clutch or breakaway will release. All you risk is a broken belt - the compressor is already junk. Besides, a metal unit could be designed to shear just as easily as a plastic unit.



B.

I don't want to be stranded due to a malfunctioning compressor, if at all possible. But yes, you could probably design a metal part to do the job and still shear without breaking the drive belt.

I almost have a dog in this hunt, as I'm about 99% sure that the compressor in our Jetta is like this. But so far, the only work done to that car has been maintenance. No issues, and nothing has yet broke. Somehow, those Mexicans got it right when they put it together.

Pete.L on Tue September 30, 2008 11:24 AM User is offline

Chick, I have a good relationship with one breakers yard local to me and they will let me "borrow" compressors if I think they have one I can use (and of course return if I cannot use it). They won't allow me to take bits off compressors, hardly surprising, but i do collect any compressors I see around car repair shops, normally they are happy to see the back of them. Thanks for the web site, will contact them later as under shipping they do sell "internationally", so that could be useful. As per schematic, the compressor drives all the time so no conventional clutch. The theory is (I assume) that a seized compressor will cause plastic plate to shear and pulley continues to run so vehicle owner can still use car as per normal but with no ac. At the rear of these compressors there is an electrical connection that links to the relevant ecu, I do not know how, but some how that is guiding the position of the swash plate to increase or decrease cooling.

Bohica2xo. That's it exactly. I'm a bit surprised you do not see them as failures, I see them with increasing frequency, more so than with conventional solenoid clutches. From what I have seen, the plastic starfish is the same on all of them. I too have wondered about alternatives. My thought was to clean up the damaged area and then fill it with epoxy. As you say it's no worse than a conventional a/c pump seizing up and I think many customers would go for that rather than face the cost of replacement compressor.

Matt L. Easy to check your Jetta, when car is stopped, can you turn the compressor clutch plate? Assuming it's not locked up! then that is a direct drive compressor. Also, no wires going to solenoid area,, but 2 wires going to tail of ac pump.

One other comment, 10 days ago, I visited a 2002 where Merc the compressor had seized, but the "starfish" clutch had not sheared!! So am I a fan, I'm afraid not. On the plus side I have a spare coil less clutch if needed for that model of Merc.

Thanks for your comments everyone.

bohica2xo on Tue September 30, 2008 1:37 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: Matt L
Quote
I don't want to be stranded due to a malfunctioning compressor, if at all possible. .

Then you better sell any car with a single serpentine belt.

Newer cars will run for hundreds of thousands of miles with good care - but when they suffer a single point failure they come home on a flatbed. That is the price you pay for the complexity that makes them so nice to drive. It does not matter if the compressor fails, or a single transistor in the PCM does - you are walking.

My '88 900SPG had 3 drive belts, and they never stranded me. The In-Tank electric fuel pumps (yes it had two) sent it home on a flatbed more than once. As did the PCM for the previous owner. I would much rather have changed a compressor & belt.

B.


Pete:

You could stand one up on end and fill the hub with epoxy easily enough. I would put a layer of grease over the bearing, and drill a few holes in the starfish to let the epoxy lock it up well. I have never had to replace a starfish, so I can't say if they are even sold as a repair part.

B.

-------------------------
"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

Karl Hofmann on Tue September 30, 2008 4:33 PM User is offlineView users profile

Pete.. I knew that these clutches would fail occasionally but it seems like it could be a bigger problem... Unfortunately I have weighed all of my duff compressors in and never really took much notice of the clutch assembly but feel that it would be possible to mould new "Starfish" I used to do quite a bit with flexible polymers so a mould would be quite easy to make but how is it held in to the metal?

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Never knock on deaths door... Ring the doorbell and run away, death really hates that!

Pete.L on Thu October 02, 2008 5:17 AM User is offline

Hi Karl, the plastic "starfish" is moulded onto a pressed steel carrier, that has 4 rivets attaching it to the pulley. If you look at Bohica's schematic you can see the 4 rivet positions on the pulley. The raised sections between the rivets are moulded plastic and these lock into the face plate (section that bolt goes through to lock onto compressor shaft). Under excess load these raised sections "collapse" - best way I can describe it, they do not shear off.

Not sure I know anything about flexible polymers, but I do know someone who runs an injection moulding company and I had planned to take a couple of these into him and ask for any thoughts. As you know, it's the end of the season in the UK, so this is something to work on over the winter! If the above gives you any ideas then let me know.

I've emailed the people in the link Chick gave me, but no reply yet.

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