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GM H6 Compressor Pressure Switch Removal

retrofit on Fri August 22, 2008 4:40 PM User is offline

Is there any way to remove the pressure switches on a H6 compressor without damage? The one-pin high pressure switch is near $70 at the AMA site so it’s best to reuse the old one if possible.

TRB on Fri August 22, 2008 6:14 PM User is offlineView users profile

Most switches are just held in with a snap ring. Most compressor do not come with the switches as you use the original ones.

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GM Tech on Sat August 23, 2008 1:42 PM User is offline

Wow $70 .. I've got those by the bag full- guess Ishould start selling them--- Yes you transfer the old switch in all cases- just don't lose the snap ring.

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

TRB on Sat August 23, 2008 1:45 PM User is offlineView users profile

Would like to know the application so I could check on the price. Very easily could have been a typo.

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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
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chris142 on Sat August 23, 2008 5:47 PM User is offline

I always bust em. So far after removing the snap ring the best way is to presurize the compressor on the bench and put a rag over the switch and a box on top. Hopefully when it goes flying out it won't get broken.

I'd say 90% of the time they break no matter how carefull you are and whatever way you go about getting it out.

retrofit on Mon August 25, 2008 7:50 PM User is offline

Here's the switch, probably used in millions of compressors (pre 1990?). Can use the newer 2-pin switch to replace it by changing the pigtail and the newer switch is half the price.

I've never tried the compressed air trick, how could you seal the ports well enough to build pressure? The surface area of the switch is much smaller than a brake piston so wouldn't it take more pressure to move it? Most of the 20 year old switches are very crusty and sealed in tight.



Edited: Mon August 25, 2008 at 7:55 PM by retrofit

TRB on Mon August 25, 2008 9:08 PM User is offlineView users profile

Thanks, I'll look into this as my vendors site is down and I can't confirm our cost. I have looked up our "cost" an its extremely high for that item. So it not just a typo this time. But that item should not cost that much!!!

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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

GM Tech on Mon August 25, 2008 10:53 PM User is offline

That switch, when used on a truck (since it is a single terminal) actually closes under higher pressure and gives a ground to the control head to open the recirc door when the control head is set to the lowest or next to lowest temp setting and the fan is on the highest or next to highest speed setting..There was a service bulletin created to actually just ground this switch to avoid the complaint that "my fan keeps speeding up and down all by itself" when actually it was just opening and closing the recirc door when it experienced high pressure- we used to call this a "poor man's climate control" and the "high-high fan scenario-- this was prevalent on '88 to about '93 C/K trucks-

So what is your application? you said H-6 compressor- maybe it can be grounded and not needed to be installed-- on some applications it could be a fan switch--

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

Edited: Tue August 26, 2008 at 7:59 AM by GM Tech

retrofit on Tue August 26, 2008 1:35 AM User is offline

Well, for sure it was used on all Fiero DA6 and HR6 compressors from 84 - 88 (V5's used the newer 2-pin switches). It was used as the high pressure cut out switch, wired directly to the clutch winding. Normally closed and opened on pressure above 425 psi.

Same switch was used on other Buick, Chevy, GM, Olds and Pontiac models during the 80's.

edit: GM p/n 6595211 (15-2206) was replaced by 89019176 (15-50809). 4-Seasons number used to be 35962 but that too was discontinued, replaced by 35961. Both are two-pin devices which require a pigtail change when replacing the 1-pin switch.

The fan switch on the Fiero was a 1-pin female that closed at 280 psi. Looked like this:



Edited: Tue August 26, 2008 at 7:12 PM by retrofit

TRB on Tue August 26, 2008 2:00 PM User is offlineView users profile

Item has been updated to the replacement kit which is why the cost is a little higher compared to just a switch.

29-30014

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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

retrofit on Tue August 26, 2008 4:49 PM User is offline

Here's what the 20-year old ones look like:






Edited: Tue August 26, 2008 at 4:58 PM by retrofit

chris142 on Sun August 31, 2008 10:34 AM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: retrofit
Here's the switch, probably used in millions of compressors (pre 1990?).



I've never tried the compressed air trick, how could you seal the ports well enough to build pressure? The surface area of the switch is much smaller than a brake piston so wouldn't it take more pressure to move it?


I've got one of those plates that come on the rear of some new compressors and it has a r12 type of screw on fitting with a schrader on it.

Bolt it to the rear of the compressor where the holes are and add air pressure.

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