Automotive Air Conditioning Information Forum (Archives)

Provided by www.ACkits.com

We've updated our forums!
Click here to visit the new forum

Archive Home

Search Auto AC Forum Archives

Low presuure switch leaking

One Ton on Tue July 08, 2008 3:14 PM User is offline

Year: 1998
Make: Chev
Model: C3500
Engine Size: 7.4
Refrigerant Type: 134
Country of Origin: United States

The low pressure switch on the side of the accumulator is leaking. Is there an o-ring to replace (what size) or one of those GM seals? OR Should I just replace the switch and seal as one?
Thanks for the help.
JC

GM Tech on Tue July 08, 2008 4:29 PM User is offline

Number one cause of a leak at that location is overtorquing that plastic base switch- look for a hairline crack in the base- if such is the case- then switch needs replaced- o-ring will come with it-- pull off old- o-ring first- then lube and roll new o-ring onto port over threads- then snug down switch to about 4 inch-pounds- or just beyond finger snug.....no new to discharge system to replace this switch..

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

GM Tech on Tue July 08, 2008 4:30 PM User is offline

Number one cause of a leak at that location is overtorquing that plastic base switch- look for a hairline crack in the base- if such is the case- then switch needs replaced- o-ring will come with it-- pull off old- o-ring first- then lube and roll new o-ring onto port over threads- then snug down switch to about 4 inch-pounds- or just beyond finger snug.....no need to discharge system to replace this switch..

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

GM Tech on Tue July 08, 2008 4:30 PM User is offline



-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

Edited: Tue July 08, 2008 at 5:36 PM by GM Tech

One Ton on Tue July 08, 2008 4:51 PM User is offline

I'm just going to replace the switch they're not that expensive. I already
figured out that I can replace it without breaking into the system. Is Nylok ok for the o-ring and threads?

Edited: Tue July 08, 2008 at 4:55 PM by One Ton

Chick on Tue July 08, 2008 8:04 PM User is offlineView users profile

Lube the new O ring with oil or nylog and when you screw the new switch on, don't over tighten, hand tight is fine..As GM tech stated, they do crack if you try to tighten them to much..hope this helps..

-------------------------
Chick
Email: Chick

---------------------------------------------

Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

One Ton on Tue July 08, 2008 8:56 PM User is offline

THANKS FOR THE HELP!!!!!!!!
I'll let you know how it goes.



Edited: Tue July 08, 2008 at 8:57 PM by One Ton

One Ton on Fri July 18, 2008 9:50 AM User is offline

THANK YOU FOR THE HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
No more leaks. Nylog is way cool.
Truck is soooooooo cold inside I'm thinking of renting out space as a meat locker.
Thanks again!

BTW I'll be back with the site sponsor when it's time to work on the AC in my 72 Impala. The compressor was in the trunk when I bought it.

Edited: Fri July 18, 2008 at 9:57 AM by One Ton

Back to Automotive Air Conditioning Forum

We've updated our forums!
Click here to visit the new forum

Archive Home

Copyright © 2016 Arizona Mobile Air Inc.