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replacing cycling switch

eddiejr on Wed June 04, 2008 4:29 PM User is offline

Year: 85
Make: GM R4 setup
Refrigerant Type: 134a

Ok here is a strange question....more on the theory of operation i guess. When you lose only a little refrigerant will air and moisture replace that volume when it bleeds out or will that not be a concern since it is under lots of pressure and only happen when the pressure gets very low? My concern being that i have ester oil in there now.

The reason i ask is that (stupid me) i instinctively removed the valve core for the cycling switch on the accumulator when i removed the one from the low side port to put on the conversion fitting. With my luck, now the cycling switch took a crap and i figured no problem, just unscrew it and screw the new one on....haha, nope! I realized this last fall but then the car went into storage. Just pulling it out recently i did a quick test and i am not down much as it blew into the 50's fairly quick (didn't get a chance to put the gauges on). With ester oil liking moisture, should i worry about that or just drain, new valvecore and switch and vacuum and re-charge?

What are your opinions?

thanks.

mk378 on Wed June 04, 2008 5:03 PM User is offline

Do not worry about it when it's only open for a couple of minutes to replace a part.

If you want to be really fastidious about it, recover to EPA specs (4 inches vacuum or better) then break the vacuum with nitrogen (up to zero pressure) and keep the nitrogen flowing in slowly to keep air from moving in until you have the valve core in place.

eddiejr on Wed June 04, 2008 9:01 PM User is offline

eddiejr on Wed June 04, 2008 9:07 PM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: mk378
Do not worry about it when it's only open for a couple of minutes to replace a part.



If you want to be really fastidious about it, recover to EPA specs (4 inches vacuum or better) then break the vacuum with nitrogen (up to zero pressure) and keep the nitrogen flowing in slowly to keep air from moving in until you have the valve core in place.

Well, actually i was just wondering if the fact that some has leaked out it that would introduce air/moisture and pose a problem for the ester oil given that it has potentially had less than full charge since the fall. I am not worried about the few minutes i will have it open to fix it as i will button up and vacuum right away. Will the ester oil be potentially degraded or less effective is what i am curious about given a minimal leak?

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