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Chevy 6.0 Liter Port locations

Northern on Tue May 20, 2008 7:50 PM User is offline

Year: 2003
Make: Chevy
Model: Silverado HD 2500
Engine Size: 6.0
Refrigerant Type: R34
Ambient Temp: NA
Pressure Low: NA
Pressure High: NA
Country of Origin: United States

Preface:
Truck was 2 years old when I bought it, 12,000mi. Owner died and it sat over a puddle rusting for one year. Many things replaced before I could drive it. After 1 year my compressor clutch self destructed, I cut the belt on the side of the highway, now one year later...

I've never had trouble finding both high and low ports before but what I see appears to be two ports within about 14 inches of the drier separated only by one fitting and 8 inches of pipe.

I've been doing all the homework I could for the last week preparing for the arrival of the new compressor/clutch assembly and the Robinair 5cfm vacuum pump.

I have only found schematics that show the high and low ports to be on different lines. This driving me crazy, I've replaced engines without ever being as stumped as I am right now.

Is it possible that the high and low sides can be on the same line?
is that fitting in between them more than just a connection point?

Thanks in advance.

Jim

Edited: Tue May 20, 2008 at 7:53 PM by Northern

Spector on Tue May 20, 2008 8:37 PM User is offline

Yup that fitting is most likely where you will find the orfiace tube look for dimpels in the tube on one side or the other of the fitting.
the orfiace tube is actually the dividing point between the high and low sides.

chris142 on Tue May 20, 2008 9:04 PM User is offline

Thats them. If you pull the caps off you will find them to be different sized. The Orifice tube is between them.

GM Tech on Tue May 20, 2008 9:57 PM User is offline

Welcome to the modern world-- GM has been doing that since about 1998 - on the C/H cars first as I remember (lesabres and Park aves-- then on down the line-- really confuses those who aren't familiar with OTs....

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

Northern on Wed May 21, 2008 8:15 AM User is offline

Thanks for confirming and clarifying. I've hesitated for years adding A/C tools to my shop but after having a few Dodges whose A/C systems failed on average every 2 years, the Intrepid sent me over the edge. I'd like to be able to keep the systems healthier without spending a fortune and this site looks like a good place to help me do that.

As I put current mechanical issues behind me I'll do more reading on preventative maintenance. I have to rely on a friend of my brother for capture and leak detection at this point. If parts need to go from now on I hope I can recoup some of the money the Dodges have cost me.

I'm sure I'll be back, I know a couple of poor souls with hot caravan's.

Thanks again

GM Tech on Wed May 21, 2008 8:58 AM User is offline

As a heads up-- Those "Hot Caravans" more than likely have evaporator leaks-- the last half dozen I have seen have had them bad-- so take a good look in that direction

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

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