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Difference in compressors

badufay on Sat April 19, 2008 4:56 PM User is offline

Year: 1998
Make: VW
Model: Golf
Engine Size: 2.0L
Refrigerant Type: R-134a
Ambient Temp: 80° F
Pressure Low: 30
Pressure High: 120

Ok, here is the latest...After thinking I was getting a new compressor under warranty from a certain autoparts store, turns out they only warranty their compressors if you buy the expansion valve and dryer from them (they claim it is a computer thing and i could fight it, but they say receipts themselves [because i ordered the parts elsewhere] aren't enough to show the items replaced, therefore only warranting the compressor for 90 days instead of a year). So F*** them. One of my buddies on the VWVortex forum pulled his new (dealer replaced right before he bought the car a few months ago) a/c compressor out of his 2000 Jetta (4 cyl, 2.0L eng) and gave it to me for free (he pulled all his a/c stuff off trying to make his 4 cyl go faster...fine by me when i get free parts). I know the hose connections are different as well as the electrical connection, but besides that is there anything else? I swapped the the back ends (the head) of the compressors since they are a perfect match except for the hose fittings, and spliced the electrical part too. I poured out the old oil in the compressor and ran clean Pag 46 through it by hand a few times. Once satisfied with it, i filled the compressor with 4 oz of new Pag 46, and then added 1 oz in the dryer Tim just sent me (thanks by the way). I flushed the system with mineral spirits (just the evaporator and condenser), and used compressed air to get all the residue out of the evaporator and condenser. I pulled a vacuum on it over night, then charged it with 29oz of r-134a. The system has been working great this last week, i have had vent temps as low as 36° F I guess I just want to know what the difference between the 2 compressors is, and also an off the subject question; In a car like mine, what controls the suction pressure, is it the expansion valve, the compressor, or the RCV? ...just curious, trying to under stand the system a little better. Thanks as always for your responses.

Ben

TRB on Sat April 19, 2008 5:45 PM User is offlineView users profile

Ice can get into the internal differences if any. But I think you were just getting junk form the beginning. Both compressors are Sanden SD7V16 models. With the head plate looking to be the only difference.

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Edited: Sat April 19, 2008 at 5:45 PM by TRB

badufay on Sat April 19, 2008 6:27 PM User is offline

Thats what i figured too. Yeah, I am wondering what Ice is going to say about the compressors. Thanks for the hook up on the dryer by the way, it makes life that much easier not having to sweat the quality of parts when already battling an uphill battle, but hopefully the system is fixed for good now. Thanks again,
Ben

Edited: Sat April 19, 2008 at 6:27 PM by badufay

TRB on Sat April 19, 2008 6:30 PM User is offlineView users profile

Thank you for your service! There are a lot of us that think highly of our military men and women!

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com


Edited: Mon April 21, 2008 at 10:37 AM by TRB

ice-n-tropics on Mon April 21, 2008 9:32 AM User is offline

Ben.
No longer have access to the SDV data base for difference between 1998 and 2000. There were very minor differences each year as evidenced by the letter stamp on the mounting ear, e.g., letter "L" I think was when they started using our compressor patent #5857839 for a quite compressor.
Also, 2000 may have changes for R-134a.
You are probably a lot better off with the 2000 OEM compressor than the Auto Zone repaint job.
Cordially,
Old IV guy


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Isentropic Efficiency=Ratio of Theoretical Compression Energy/Actual Energy.
AMAZON.com: How To Air Condition Your Hot Rod

TRB on Mon April 21, 2008 10:39 AM User is offlineView users profile

Retirement, can't wait to be fishing and mountain bike riding on a daily basis! Still plan to come out and see you when I hit Dallas next time.

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

ice-n-tropics on Mon April 21, 2008 12:24 PM User is offline

TRB
Retirement my foot! No time for the Fish or Hogs.
This job south of Ft. Worth that I fell into, designing A/C for military vehicles is 7 days/wk. They were just desperate for anyone who needed a job so bad that they will work in a 130 F (Irag temp - ask Ben) wind tunnel day after day. Smart guys all got too hot and quit (worse that Phoenix or LV) or got frustrated with hydraulic and 28.5 volt drive compressor drive motors.
Can't believe people would choose to live in Phoenix or LV, worse than Texas.
Cordially,
Old IV guy

-------------------------
Isentropic Efficiency=Ratio of Theoretical Compression Energy/Actual Energy.
AMAZON.com: How To Air Condition Your Hot Rod

TRB on Mon April 21, 2008 12:35 PM User is offlineView users profile

Hey quit picking on Northern Mexico, I mean Phoenix!

-------------------------

When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

badufay on Mon April 21, 2008 3:40 PM User is offline

We use this vest type system...it is an upper body vest that has little capillaries in it for chilled water (and an antifreeze and antimicrobial agent) to pass through. The water is cycled through a miniature a/c unit in the back of the aircraft and chilled again...basically the vests are heat exchangers. They work great! The water temp is controlled via a thermostat that each crew member has. It is pretty nice flying around baghdad when it is 120° F and you stay completely dry...(don't even bother on asking why we don't have a/c's in Blackhawks) anyway the system works really well, and most of the time it is too cold to have it set on max. When i get back to Iraq in a few days, ill take some pics and post them. The system is well, a cool system.

ice-n-tropics on Tue April 22, 2008 9:57 AM User is offline

Ben,
I look forward to seeing your chill vest and cooler unit pictures. How many vests can be operated at one time? Is there a separate A/C for the electronics? What compressor is used?
I have a prototype chiller hydronic heat exchanger and cooling vest similar to your description.
One big advantage is that in damage circumstances, the user is not exposed to the burning refrigerant blowing into his face.
Also this seems to me to be the safest and best application of the limited available refrigeration capacity that is available in uninsulated military vehicles.
The thick steel or aluminum hulls are such a large thermal storage that only spot cooling is possible if the vehicle operation is not to be hindered/decreased.
Cordially,
Old IV guy

-------------------------
Isentropic Efficiency=Ratio of Theoretical Compression Energy/Actual Energy.
AMAZON.com: How To Air Condition Your Hot Rod

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