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help me decide

LarryP on Fri March 28, 2008 8:26 AM User is offline

Year: 1993
Make: Pontiac
Model: Bonneville
Engine Size: 3800
Refrigerant Type: R12
Country of Origin: United States

I figured I'd start a new topic - I hope this is okay... This is a continuation of trying to get all the oil out of a compressor, I now have two compressors on my bench, not sure which one I should use - advice appreciated:
Compressor #1) New when the retro to 134a was done, system worked fine when the car was disassmbled for restoration. Putting it back to R12, I've flushed with a full quart of mineral oil, but still have some dye in it from the 134a days. Feels great when spun, never any junk came out when I was flushing.
Compressor #2) Came off the parts car, AC was not running when the car was parted out. I was surprised to see that this car still had a full charge of R12 when parted out, I now wish I had looked into why it had no AC, because as I found out last night one of the pins on the clutch was bent, so, no AC. I could have fixed that easily and then seen how the system was functioning. This compressor is a OEM, but I have no idea if it is original, I have no history on the car. When I parted the car over 2 years ago, I just yanked it, bagged and boxed it. Last night, I turned it over and the oil ran out perfectly clean. Turning it by hand, feels great, just like compressor #1. Fixed the pin on the clutch, put 12 volts to it, works fine.
So, do I want to use the OEM which seems fine but no history, or the Aftermarket with 134a that I know this history of but I can't seem to get all the old oil out of? Personally, right now I am leaning towards the OEM... Please advise.. Larry

GM Tech on Fri March 28, 2008 9:39 AM User is offline

If you are going back to R-12- I'd stay with the compressor that has NEVER seen 134a--- if you can still read the compressor label- next to the word "code" is the date code-- also- if the label is orange- it is a service compressor- if the label does not say Delphi anywhere- it is an aftermarket or a rebuilt unit- if the compressor is painted- it is an aftermarket or rebuilt unit- if the label is green it is usually an indicator of a R-12 OEM application-- a blue label meant 134a OEM application-- hope this helps

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

LarryP on Fri March 28, 2008 10:15 AM User is offline

Thanks for the reply!! I've got the compressor on my desk, the label is intact, perfectly readable. Silver metallic label, with blue and yellow coloring on it, makes it real pretty. In the blue part, says Harrison, division of General motors, with the harrison and GM logos.
In the yellow, is the R-12 under pressure caution.
In the all silver part, etched numbers.. code:032333 HR6 HE, sae J639, model # 1136024
The unit is all black, except of course for where the pipes hook up!
No other labels on the compressor.

There was no indication whatsoever that there was ever anything but R12 in it, no retro labels or retro charging ports, of course I suppose it is possible that someone hacked it and didn't change or label anything. When I saw that there was still charge in the system, the car was still driveable, I brought it to a local repair shop, they recovered the charge, didn't say anythng about it not being R12.. So all indications are that is never had 134a.

Please advise what you think about this origins of this compressor. Thanks. Mike

LarryP on Sat March 29, 2008 8:58 AM User is offline

hey guys, any thought on the age of this compressor? The date code does not make a lot of sense to me..

Also, I want to change the shaft seal, just to make sure it does not fail in 3 months, and I want to adjust the air gap, maybe repack the bearing. So, I pulled out my mastercool took kit, 91269 (I think) I've had this for several years, and I find that my clutch remover and installer tools don't thread into the clutch - my tools have have a coarse thread, and both my compressors have a finer thread. What is that thread size? metric? SAE fine? Something else? I want to get a bolt of proper size, drill it, tap it for the center piece. Can someome please tell me? Thanks. Larry

retrofit on Mon May 12, 2008 11:51 AM User is offline

Guessing from previous information posted here, the date code of 032333 means it was made 03/23/93. The month and date are easy to figure out but the year is a little confusing. Maybe the last (sixth) digit signifies the decade in some way? Not sure about that because the newer nine digit codes use the sixth digit as part of a time stamp.

GM Tech on Mon May 12, 2008 10:31 PM User is offline

It was made 3/23/93 on 3rd shift......believe me- I know. This was the last year for OEM GM painted compressors

You've got the old style puller- you need the newer one for compressors 1986 and up- it has the metric threads- the pulley bearing is not repackablle-- it is permanently sealed

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

steve325is on Fri August 29, 2008 12:49 PM User is offline

My V5 has a code of 062111424D. Any idea how to decode this one? I just noticed over the weekend that the label proclaimed that it is a "Service Part".

-- Steve

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