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400 psi discharge

GJR65 on Sun January 13, 2008 12:56 PM User is offlineView users profile

Year: 1999
Make: Chevy
Model: C1500
Engine Size: 305
Refrigerant Type: 134a
Ambient Temp: 70
Pressure Low: 35
Pressure High: 425
Country of Origin: United States

I just got my truck out of the body shop after hitting a deer. The A/C worked fine before and now it doesn't, the condenser was damaged but it still held a charge. The body shop put a new aftermarket condenser and a factory drier. Now it doesn't cool. I put gauges on it and the suction side was between 35 & 40 but the discharge side went up to 425 before the pressure switch cut it off.
Thinking that they installed the orifice tube in backwards I called them and they sent me to a dealer (GM) that they swap work out with. The dealer took the orifice out ( they said it was installed correctly ) and installed a new one and blew through the condenser to check for a restriction, put it back together and it still has a 425 psi discharge. The dealer said that my compressor is bad.
How can the compressor be bad when it is pumping out 425+ psi ? Could the body shop have put to much oil in ? Please help !!!

JJM on Sun January 13, 2008 2:38 PM User is offline

Friggen deer... why aren't the hunters out shooting all of them?

If this compressor is bad with over 400 PSI high side pressure that would be a first for me.

- Is the cooling fan functioning properly?
- How much R-134a was added?
- How much oil was added?

I would also try removing the OT and see what happens... you could possibly have two in there somewhere.

Joe

Cussboy on Sun January 13, 2008 2:52 PM User is offline

I doubt the body shop, or the insurance examer, is an AC specialist. Make them fix it right, and now. It was working before.

bohica2xo on Sun January 13, 2008 2:57 PM User is offline

3 stooges auto repair.

Body shop mechanical repairs seem to require lots of rework - missing ground wires / used or knock-off parts / missing fasteners / utter BS fed to the customer....

If this is an insurance job, contact your agent and tell him the A/C is a total FUBAR and needs to go to a dealer or specialist.

Going to the dealer they "swap out work with" will just get you hosed even more. "Blowing through" a condensor is not a test at all, and you already have an "aftermarket" condensor - typical bodyshop/used car BS. You need a 15-62892 AC DELCO condensor for that truck.

At this point a system flush is probably in order, because if the unknown oil issue. They probably did not replace the dryer either. Blaming a compressor that will push 400+ psi is garbage - Larry Moe & Curly are covering each other's butts. Time to cover yours.

B.

-------------------------
"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

iceman2555 on Sun January 13, 2008 5:08 PM User is offlineView users profile

Agreement with the other post...get the system repaired properly.
Looking at this vehicle...the actual pressure being displayed is discharge pressures. The service ports on this vehicle are mounted in the a/c hose/manifold assembly. Since the pressures at this point are higher than normal....the first aspect would be to look for a restriction...esp with the low side reading indicated. It is quite possible with this system for the condenser to be mounted in an inverted position...or for the discharge and liquid lines to be reversed. First would be to check the routing of the discharge and liquid lines. The discharge (from the compressor to the condenser) should connect to the TOP condenser fitting. The liquid line should be connected to the condenser outlet...the bottom line and the connection is just behind or near the right turn signal/marker light housing. If the lines are reversed....and the orifice is installed properly...the discharge gases are being pushed thru the orifice tube in the opposite direction of flow....hence the excessive high side pressures. If the condenser is installed incorrectly...upside down...the same condition would be evident.
Installation of an aftermarket condenser may not be a serious problem....if the condenser is of the same metal construction and has the same heat transfer. Check to insure that the condenser is made of aluminum and that it is a true parallel flow unit. If unsure...post a photo.
If condenser is installed correctly....time to go back to basics....recover refrigerant...flush to remove all lubricants....replace the accumulator...or at least drain as completely as possible....install the correct amount and type of lubricant...recharge to OE specs and retest. Post results if the problem persist. It is most important to know how much lubricant and how much refrigerant is in the system....NO1 to correctly diagnostic tool.
Good luck with the repair.

-------------------------
The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.
Thomas Jefferson

GM Tech on Sun January 13, 2008 6:52 PM User is offline

sounds like the "classic plumbed wrong scenario" the condenser inlet and oitlet use the same threaded fitting---does the hose from the compressor go to the top of the condenser? if not it is plumbed backwards-- have seen it about a dozen times-- always from a body shop and usually after a deer strike---

My money is on the reversed lines scenario.......

Usually all you have to say is GM C/K truck and poor cooling and this comes to mind.......................

-------------------------
The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

GJR65 on Sun January 13, 2008 9:12 PM User is offlineView users profile

The dealer said that there recovery machine was able to pull all the oil out of the system and they said that was the correct amount pulled out and put back in.

Chick on Sun January 13, 2008 9:30 PM User is offlineView users profile

Find another dealer, or better, find an AC shop that knows what they are doing. A recovery machine can recover refrigerant, only way to remove the oil is to flush. Follow the others advice yourself and see if the condenser is plumbed wrong. Common problem, and once you know for sure, you can bring it back to the shop and make them fix it right.. No reason for a working system to stop working because of a condenser change, they screwed up plain and simple..Telling you that you need a compressor when it is "obviously" working is the first red flag..Believe nothing they say from there...Hope this helps..

-------------------------
Chick
Email: Chick

---------------------------------------------

Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

tony1963 on Sun January 13, 2008 9:57 PM User is offline

I'm thinking that the system is overcharged?

-------------------------
Grove Automotive Group, Inc.

An Alabama Corporation

GJR65 on Sun January 13, 2008 10:09 PM User is offlineView users profile

The pressure hose goes to the o-tube ! Thanks guys!
I will be at the body shop first thing in the morning!


Tony 1963, Where in Alabama are you located? I would like to maybe bring it to you.

GJR65 on Sun January 13, 2008 10:28 PM User is offlineView users profile

One other thing, what if any damage could have been done now, since the discharge was blowing into the wrong side of the o-tube ?
Would that hurt a 9 year old compressor ?

Chick on Sun January 13, 2008 10:34 PM User is offlineView users profile

The high side does go into the O tube, after leaving the condenser..but how it enters the condenser is of concern. It has to enter the top after leaving the compressor, this way it flows down and is cooled and "condenses" more efficiently and leaves the bottom of the condenser a hot gas/liquid, and goes thru the O tube where it changes state.. That is what needs to be checked..



-------------------------
Chick
Email: Chick

---------------------------------------------

Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

bohica2xo on Mon January 14, 2008 2:40 AM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: GJR65
The dealer said that there recovery machine was able to pull all the oil out of the system and they said that was the correct amount pulled out and put back in.

Uh huh. Recover the oil charge through the service ports. Not likely. Time to find an A/C shop, sounds like you have 2 oil charges in the system now...

B.

-------------------------
"Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest."
~ Mahatma Gandhi, Gandhi, An Autobiography, M. K. Gandhi, page 446.

GJR65 on Mon January 14, 2008 9:28 AM User is offlineView users profile

What I meant to say was that the discharge hose from the compressor is hooked to the bottom of the condenser where the o-tube is.

Now that ya'll have found the problem do I have another? Since the discharge of the compressor has basically been dead heading into the outlet of the o-tube, could there have been any damage to the 8 year old compressor from lack of oil flow or trying to blow into the wrong end of the o-tube ?

Thanks again for the help !

P.S. How can I help support this site ?

NickD on Mon January 14, 2008 10:17 AM User is offline

I almost hit a deer the other night, but without thinking, my foot slammed on the brake, was close, just don't expect to see these things in town. You can bet your insurance rates are going up next time, these guys have a huge database that is shared with all the insurance companies and know more about you than you know about yourself, kind of hate computers for this reason. When my car was hit in the parking lot a couple of years ago, had to get it repaired under my collision, but switched companies shorty after before that claim was recorded.

You know you can put a wheel on backwards, but will find the studs are too short, since you can't find studs long enough, you knock the old ones out and go to the hardware store and buy anything that is close. Sounds incredibly stupid, but ran into body shops that do stuff like that. Someone really had to go out of their way to reverse you condenser hoses, if they are flexible hoses, one is always shorter than the other, didn't that ring a bell with this guy? I had to really fight with mostly the other guys insurance company to choose the body shop of my choice. Even after I send my estimates in, they come up with some shady outfit, had to go to small claims court a couple of times as I knew the reputation of these shops was she-at.

I didn't know until now that I was wasting my valuable time to take a system apart to drain the oil, gee, all I have to do is hook up my vacuum pump and let that thing pull all the oil out. I love these boards, learn something new everyday. Had the stupid impression, the only way to make sure you have the correct amount of oil in the system was to take everything apart, drain and/or flush it, then add exactly the correct amount.

If the outlet of the compressor fed the O-tube directly, why did they put in the condenser? Are your problems for real?

My Chevy and Ford dealer in town have been pretty good, and they know beforehand that I will check every nut and bolt and will scream bloody murder if I find even one lock washer missing. And they all better be OE hardware. Give them hell.

iceman2555 on Mon January 14, 2008 12:26 PM User is offlineView users profile

Nick understand the difference in hose length and the almost necessary desire to hook the system up incorrectly...unfortunately on these vehicles the inlet and outlet of the condenser are the same fitting/thread size and to complicate mattes a bit more...the a/c hoses are just sufficiently long enough to route them incorrectly. Once they enter thru the cutout on the rad core support....the bends and length do allow for a cross mating. For a tech, esp one not accustomed to A/C system...it is an not to uncommon mistake. Heck have received calls from AC techs concerning the same problem.
Hopefully this is the only problem this person is experiencing.
GJR, although it is possible that the compressor could be harmed when operating in this manner....it is doubtful that a problem has occurred. Operational of the system under these conditions for a extended period of time could of course be detrimental to the system components.
As a matter of note...a good thought would be to locate a good AC shop in your area and get them to service the vehicle. From the statements contributed to this shop....it is doubtful that they are prepared for this repair...either that or they no longer wish to be associated with this repair and simply desire that your fade into the sunset.
Good luck...let us know what you discover.


-------------------------
The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.
Thomas Jefferson

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