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Condenser size

mjlinder on Sun October 14, 2007 3:29 PM User is offlineView users profile

Year: 1987
Make: Jeep
Model: Grand Wagoneer
Engine Size: 6.5l TD

I'm starting to put together the pieces for my project and had a question about condenser size. Is this one of those things where bigger is always better and therefore run the biggest that I can fit in there?

Vehicle is a 1987 Jeep Grand Wagoneer that has had a GM 6.5L turbo diesel stuffed under the hood. Due to the size of the engine, all of the stock AC components had to be removed. I am installing an under-dash aftermarket piece, probably one of the Gen-IV units from Vintage Air (mainly because they require no vacuum, as I have no source of vacuum). I need a lot of cold air - this is a big vehicle with lots of windows and I live in Phoenix.

I plan to stop by the AMA shop either this week or next. I'll be using one of their parallel flow condensers, plus get the hoses, fittings, etc...

Thanks!

Chick on Sun October 14, 2007 4:10 PM User is offlineView users profile

I'm not quite sure if I'm reading this correctly. No matter what unit you install under the dash, if the system is open, such as changing the condenser and hoses, ultimately a vacuum will need to be pulled. Wise choice stopping by AMA, as one of their tech can advise you on the condenser size. So much easier to do while looking at the vehicle... Also, I believe they have underdash units available too. If you really want to do the job yourself, they of course sell very reasonable priced vacuum pumps. (Economy pumps) and if you have none of the tools, they have the DIY packages which may help you...Otherwise, follow their advice as far as condenser, or anything else they inform you is needed, and do the work yourself, and drive back to have them vac/charge the system for you..It's a win, win for you...Hope this helps..

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Chick
Email: Chick

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Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

TRB on Sun October 14, 2007 8:30 PM User is offlineView users profile

Come on by we would be glad to help with any of your questions.

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When considering your next auto A/C purchase, please consider the site that supports you: ACkits.com
Contact: ACKits.com

chris142 on Sun October 14, 2007 9:58 PM User is offline

The engine should have a vacuum pump for brakes and dash controls bolted to it and driven with a belt.

2POINTautO on Sun October 14, 2007 10:26 PM User is offlineView users profile

You mentioned living in a hot part of the country and having lots of windows. I have been out of the USA for a long time but here we have a clear window tint for the front glass, and anywhere else dark tint is not allowed by law, to block out UV Rays and lower the inside vehicle temps along with regular dark tint on the side windows and a lesser dark tint for the rear window (for backing up at night), it has proven to be effective with a reduction in the vehicle interior heat allowing the AC to work at an accellerated rate compared to a vehicle without tint and even vehicles with dark tint but no clear front glass tint installed.

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Give all the dirty details
and dont forget the LO & HI pressures
Year, Make & Model would be nice too

mjlinder on Mon October 22, 2007 2:04 PM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: chris142
The engine should have a vacuum pump for brakes and dash controls bolted to it and driven with a belt.

Nope. No pump. Nothing on the vehicle is vacuum controlled. Brakes are now hydroboost.


EDIT - Just noticed your name! Go back to JOUT. Hahahahahaaa! (DieselSJ).

Edited: Mon October 22, 2007 at 2:07 PM by mjlinder

mjlinder on Mon October 22, 2007 2:05 PM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: 2POINTautO
You mentioned living in a hot part of the country and having lots of windows. I have been out of the USA for a long time but here we have a clear window tint for the front glass, and anywhere else dark tint is not allowed by law, to block out UV Rays and lower the inside vehicle temps along with regular dark tint on the side windows and a lesser dark tint for the rear window (for backing up at night), it has proven to be effective with a reduction in the vehicle interior heat allowing the AC to work at an accellerated rate compared to a vehicle without tint and even vehicles with dark tint but no clear front glass tint installed.

The plan is to tint all the rear windows. I like the sound of a UV blocker for the windshield and front door windows - I'll need to see if they have that here. Thanks for the tip!

mjlinder on Mon October 22, 2007 2:13 PM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: Chick
I'm not quite sure if I'm reading this correctly. No matter what unit you install under the dash, if the system is open, such as changing the condenser and hoses, ultimately a vacuum will need to be pulled. Wise choice stopping by AMA, as one of their tech can advise you on the condenser size. So much easier to do while looking at the vehicle... Also, I believe they have underdash units available too. If you really want to do the job yourself, they of course sell very reasonable priced vacuum pumps. (Economy pumps) and if you have none of the tools, they have the DIY packages which may help you...Otherwise, follow their advice as far as condenser, or anything else they inform you is needed, and do the work yourself, and drive back to have them vac/charge the system for you..It's a win, win for you...Hope this helps..

Sorry, I probably should have just stuck to asking the simple question of - When selecting a new condenser, is bigger always better?

I have the tools to do everything else (most of them purchased from AMA).

ScotY on Tue October 23, 2007 2:15 AM User is offlineView users profile

I, too, am curious to know how a condenser is sized. Is there a formula or guidelines that one would use?

I have a kit from AMA and it's a tight fit, so smaller would be much nicer. After I get the system up and running (thank to Eric for answering my many questions!), I might want to try a smaller condenser. The reason being is I would like to do some mods to the vehicle and the present sized condenser won't allow this.

Unfortunately, I can't stop by the shop and seek personal advice, so any info here would be very useful.

Thanks, Scot

2POINTautO on Tue October 23, 2007 6:57 AM User is offlineView users profile

I dont know the formula, but as you are thinking, there is one, the inside of an entire AC system has an area, measured in lets say cubic inches, freon has a mass to fill the area. At certain temps, say 70F to 120F freon is designed to cool the best with a certain pressure / temperature relationship. In one given system, too much or too little freon will not cool well, but that very same amount of freon in a bigger or smaller system will work perfectly.

I have some swamp land in Panama City to sell too. Does the MACS book cover this?

They say that you cant service by superheat in a MVAC system, but if you service a good operational system by vent temp output only, say around 40F ~ 35F, I would be happy with that not knowing the exact specs of a home made system.

-------------------------
Give all the dirty details
and dont forget the LO & HI pressures
Year, Make & Model would be nice too

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