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refirgerant recovery

vdubnut on Thu September 13, 2007 11:17 PM User is offline

Year: 1991
Make: chev
Model: suburban
Engine Size: 5.7
Refrigerant Type: 134

just wondering if when a shop uses a refrigerant recovery machine, if they actually recycle the refrigerant?

If so, would it make sense that if they are recharging your vehicle afterwards that they would credit you or re-use your refrigerant?

2POINTautO on Fri September 14, 2007 5:50 AM User is offlineView users profile

I am not the law maker in your state, county or city but I have heard many times and I have seen it in print, a shop may keep your old freon to cover the cost of the recycle machine, I do believe that this was more towards a vihicle that leaks and may be so bad as to leak out in a day or two, no need to let it go to waste, I also believe that this was a scenario where the tech did not charge for anything but he kept the freon to pay for his machine time. Escentially, there should be a charge for what the tech did but he elected to keep your gas instead.

The other side of the coin, your recycled gas can be used for leak testing other cars and the shop where you went ONLY uses VIRGIN gas to service cars that are believed to be leak free for warantee purposes, you should recieve a credit for that gas kept if you were charged full price for the virgin gas installed in your car. It is also possible that along with complete repair and service at this shop, they may be forced by the request of some customers to only do a top off with no warantee (and if its legal), this recycled gas is what may be used if the shop tests it for contamination and sealants and deems it to be 99% pure. Or something like that. I do not know US laws for topping off R134a, I think many states do not allow topping off R12 by professional??????????

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Give all the dirty details
and dont forget the LO & HI pressures
Year, Make & Model would be nice too

mk378 on Fri September 14, 2007 9:21 AM User is offline

The laws in the US are complicated about this and I'm not sure if I'm going to remember it right. First off there are "recovery" machines which just put the refrigerant into a tank and "recycle" systems which attempt to purify it. If a "recovery" process has been used it is only legal to reuse the refrigerant back in the same car or another system with the same owner. It is not legal to simply put it in a different person's car without "recycling" it first. Or it can be processed at a recycling facility (typically an off-site factory) and purified then sold in general commerce. There is no such thing as "virgin" refrigerant. Recycled refrigerant which meets purity standards can be sold the same as newly produced. A container of refrigerant may contain new, recycled, or a mixture and it does not have to be labelled.

2POINTautO on Fri September 14, 2007 9:51 AM User is offlineView users profile

Freon in Japan from used and recycled (junked) cars is destroyed by the government, you actually have to pay to junk your car here and you have to pay more if you have AC (freon in it or not) and even more yet if you have an airbag and all vehicles newer than the mid 90's has an airbag or two. I beg to differ on the fact that there is virgin freon, there are dozens of manufacturers and I know they are not recycling over here, they destroy the used stuff. On one point, shops do recover and reservice here without testing for anything and shops do have recycle machines and may not test for anything either so what is getting recycled and put back in that come from a recycle tank that has been hooked up to a dozen vehicles today. Without testing who knows.

Brand new 30lb tanks are temp tested and weighed to show that it is only 98% full because it has air in it, dont get me started on this one, I am just glad they dont do conversions over here and drop ins are legal.

-------------------------
Give all the dirty details
and dont forget the LO & HI pressures
Year, Make & Model would be nice too

Cussboy on Fri September 14, 2007 8:27 PM User is offline

I don't know what the regulations or common practices are here in Arizona, but here's my personal experiences. An '88 Suburban (R-12) with a hole in the condenser (most likely from a rock) was repaired by Rayco in Scottsdale in the 1990s; they only charged me for 1 pound R-12, recovered 4 pounds from mine. Purchased 1994 Suburban in 2000 (R-134a) with bad compressor, had my local mechanic repair it; he measured my refrigerant and only charged me any difference. When that compressor was replaced by him in 2005, same. When my home AC compressor went out in 2005 (with a few months remaining on compressor parts warranty), of course the R-22 was recovered (it's the law), but I was charged for full amount of replacement R-22. So I probably paid "twice" for the home AC refrigerant. For my own truck and a friend's car, I have recovered our R-12 before the repair and re-used it on our own vehicles.

scubadiver on Fri September 14, 2007 10:33 PM User is offline

Motorhome recently serviced in PA. They used a Snap-on tester on the 134a in the vehicle before servicing, recovered it with a Snap-on recycling machine they said was extremely expensive, weighed it out, did the repair and weighed it back in. 7 pounds came out, put back six (it was overcharged by the previous tech) and charged for six..........and had charged for the seven when they put it in too........That's why I read this board.

TRB on Fri September 14, 2007 10:57 PM User is offlineView users profile

If you come into our shop with refrigerant in the vehicle. You leave with the same amount you had at no charge. If you need more and a repair, we charge for that.

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bearing01 on Sat September 15, 2007 4:33 PM User is offline

Will most shops discharge your AC system for free? If not, what would they typically charge?

bobbyrae on Tue December 04, 2007 10:37 AM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: bearing01
Will most shops discharge your AC system for free? If not, what would they typically charge?

I believe that the term used for removing refrigerant from your system is evacuation, and that is probably what you are talking about. It all depends on what other work they would be doing and what refrigerant is in the system, but no, it is not typically free. This is because the equipment they use has to be certified and it takes some time. There is also the cost of disposal and recycling. I would expect $50-$100.

Not sure if this answers your question and it might be better to start a separate thread for it.

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