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Add all oil to compressor after flushing?

Cj on Thu July 19, 2007 9:08 AM User is offline

Year: 1988
Make: Toyota
Model: Supra

I'm replacing a 10PA17C Nippondenso compressor and have flushed out the rest of the system. The Toyota service manual states to add the oil to the compressor when replacing components, it states:

Compressor oil capacity: 2.7 oz

If receiver was replaced, add oil to compressor: Add .7 oz

If condenser was replaced, add oil to compressor: Add 1.4-1.7 oz

If evaporator was replaced, add oil to compressor: Add 1.4-1.7 oz

Do you think it would be alright to add all 6.8 oz of oil to the compressor or should it be added to each component as usually recommended? thanks

mk378 on Thu July 19, 2007 9:18 AM User is offline

Yes it's often done, put all the oil in the compressor. If you're worried about having too much oil in the compressor, turn it by hand several revolutions after starting to charge but before starting the engine. That will clear any excess out.

CyFi on Mon July 28, 2008 5:16 PM User is offline

an anyone else confirm this? It seems odd that the capacity is 2.7 oz but i will be pouring in almost 7oz into the compressor

Chick on Mon July 28, 2008 6:01 PM User is offlineView users profile

On some compressors it's hard due to moving it around it spills out. But yes, you can add as much as you can, then turn the center hub a dozen or so times to move the excess out in to the line. Most assembly lines load the entire oil charge to the compressor while it's rolling down the line and it's charged in seconds..If you feel uncomfortable, add three ounces to the compressor and the rest to the drier..It will be thru the system in secionds on start up...hope this helps..

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Chick
Email: Chick

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Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

chris142 on Mon July 28, 2008 10:30 PM User is offline

I always put an ounce or so into the compressor then the rest wherever it will fit.

GM Tech on Mon July 28, 2008 11:58 PM User is offline

Chick- actually, the oil is shipped to the assembly plant inside each compressor already-- this way there is never an argument about who put the oil in-or how much-- the folks who make the compressor do it and if it is missing or wrong then it is their fault- no one elses.

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

Chick on Tue July 29, 2008 6:19 AM User is offlineView users profile

Quote
Originally posted by: GM Tech
Chick- actually, the oil is shipped to the assembly plant inside each compressor already-- this way there is never an argument about who put the oil in-or how much-- the folks who make the compressor do it and if it is missing or wrong then it is their fault- no one elses.

I do remember you telling us that before.. Assembly lines wouldn't have the time or money to pay a worker to pour oil in a compressor.. Thanks for correcting that..
But it always has amazed me why they don't blow their pistons from oil slugging.. I thinbk it was you that also explained the fact that on an Aurora, I believe, that when started the compressor turns while the engine cranks for that reason, to clear refrigerant out of the compressor slowly to keep it from slugging.. Of course I had to watch a couple to see for myself...

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Chick
Email: Chick

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Freedoms just another word for nothing left to lose

GM Tech on Tue July 29, 2008 8:24 AM User is offline

Almost every GM car has a "slugging routine" algorithm- that is activated during engine crank- usually only for 0.2 seconds- which is usually 2-3 turns of the compressor. this is to clear the compressor of any liquid refrigerant prior to running. The algorithm considers a lot of things like coolant temp on last engine shut down, ambient temp, inside temp, evap temp, last engine run time, elasped engine off time- lots of things to decide whether or not to run the "slugging routine" Heck- I spent many hours purposely filling and slugging compressors trying to bust them apart-- they are a lot tougher than you might think. To test turns during crank- I would put a clutch puller tool in the hub of compressor, then tie a string and weight to it- then count the number of wraps of the string-the slugging routine runs whether a/c is requested or not.

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The number one A/C diagnostic tool there is- is to know how much refrigerant is in the system- this can only be done by recovering and weighing the refrigerant!!
Just a thought.... 65% of A/C failures in my 3200 car diagnostic database (GM vehicles) are due to loss of refrigerant due to a leak......

HECAT on Tue July 29, 2008 10:04 AM User is offline

Quote
Originally posted by: CyFi
an anyone else confirm this? It seems odd that the capacity is 2.7 oz but i will be pouring in almost 7oz into the compressor

The individual figures you reference from Toyota are a calculated amount to use when replacing that item only. This is the "oil balancing" procedure the factories use for warranty service procedures when many times the system is still virgin and clean. Since you have flushed this system and it is clean and dry (make sure), you will need to add the full load of oil; and all to the compressor is OK as the other posters have explained.


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HECAT: www.hecatinc.com You support the Forum when you consider www.ackits.com for your a/c parts.

FLUSHING TECHNICAL PAPER vs2.pdf 

CyFi on Wed July 30, 2008 12:27 AM User is offline

Thanks for the help. I have another question. Upon looking at one of the read only links to the napa capacity charts, it says the supra holds 8.8oz of oil, now im confused, how much should i put in? The factory repair manual does not give a full system capacity, but rather it gives what was previously posted, saying to add so much for each part replaced. Thanks for any help.

CyFi on Sat September 04, 2010 4:47 AM User is offline

Can anyone else confirm the oil capacity for an 87 Toyota Supra? Looks like its somewhere around 7-8oz? And to confirm just once again to make sure, all of it goes into the compressor in a completely dry system? Thanks very much!

iceman2555 on Sat September 04, 2010 12:40 PM User is offlineView users profile

Never seems to amaze that all this discussion of lube charge amount and where to add to the system and then the issue of charging the system by hand with an attempt to completely recharge the vehicle to perceived acceptable pressure. The amount of lube in the system is,indeed, very important but the amount of refrigerant within the system is important also.....without the correct amount, the lube will not flow thru out the system to replenish the compressor. Operational pressures were derived from a fully charged system...not the other way around. The variations of posted pressures is to allow for operational deficiencies. Adding retrofitting to this procedure and it becomes more and more difficult to maintain correct refrigerant and lube flow.
An undercharge of this system with 12 of less than 2 oz can result in a reduction of lube flow and undercharge of less than 4 oz can result in loss of lube flow.
8 oz of lube should be sufficient. Add it all to the compressor, if you can, it may be very difficult to add this total amount into the compressor case itself. Why not add lube to the compressor as spec'ed, all 1 oz to the rec/drier, the remainder could be added directly into the evaporator.
The system will balance itself.


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The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.
Thomas Jefferson

CyFi on Sat September 04, 2010 3:09 PM User is offline

Thanks for the info, i just wanted to make sure that i am putting the correct amount for this vehicle, as i don't have access to any service information. Im not going to be charging the system by pressure so that shouldn't be an issue. I'm having AMA charge my system(R12), but because i am assembling the system myself i need to put the oil in it before i hand it over to them. It seems logical that the oil could be distributed throughout the system, but was questioning that because of the direct instructions to put it all in the compressor, i figured there was a specific reason or they wouldn't have said that.

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